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Archaea

Definition

noun, singular: archaeon

(1) Any of the unicellular microorganisms that is genetically distinct from bacteria and eukaryotes, and often inhabiting extreme environmental conditions.

(2) One in the three-domain system (the other are Bacteria and Eukaryota) which includes halophiles (microorganisms that may inhabit extremely salty environments), methanogens (microorganisms that produce methane), and thermophiles (microorganisms that can thrive extremely hot environments)


Supplement

Archaea or archaebacteria evolved separately from eubacteria and eukaryotes. They are similar with eubacteria in being prokaryotes and lacking distinct cell nucleus. They differ in terms of ribosomal structure, the possession of introns (in some species) and in membrane structure or composition. They are similar to eukaryotes in ways that archaea possess genes and several metabolic pathways that are more closely related to those of eukaryotes: notably the enzymes involved in transcription and translation.

They are regarded to be living fossils and survivors of an ancient group of organisms that bridged the gap in evolution between eubacteria and eukaryotes.


Word origin: New Latin, from Greek arkhaion, neuter singular of arkhaios, ancient. Related forms: archae.

Synonym: archaebacteria.
Compare: eubacteria.


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Living or not? (viruses,viroids and prions).

... words, the viruses seem to have had a common ancestor with eukaryotes, but it split off right after the eukaryotes diverged from bacteria and archaea. (This also argues against the horizontal gene transfer idea, since there doesn't seem to be a species out there that the genes could have been ...

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by Sumanth001
Sun Dec 08, 2013 12:37 pm
 
Forum: Microbiology
Topic: Living or not? (viruses,viroids and prions).
Replies: 15
Views: 4865

Re: Bacterial Taxonomy

There probably aren't any archaea that you have to worry about. Archaea are rare, and no archaeans are known pathogens. However, if you do happen to be looking at an archaean, it may have hami instead of fimbriae. Hami are similar to fimbriae—both ...

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by wildfunguy
Tue Dec 03, 2013 12:21 am
 
Forum: Microbiology
Topic: Bacterial Taxonomy
Replies: 3
Views: 1639

Bacterial Taxonomy

Also, Archaea... How can I tell the difference between them and bacteria with a 200x microscope? (getting a 1000x and 2000x as soon as possible) And what Archaea is beneficial to plant and soil life?

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by Sophiahotep
Thu Nov 14, 2013 10:40 pm
 
Forum: Microbiology
Topic: Bacterial Taxonomy
Replies: 3
Views: 1639

Bacterial Taxonomy

... in General Bacteria reproduce asexually, with the most common method being binary fission. They all have peptidoglycan cell walls , unlike archaea. Deeply Branching Bacteria The major phyla of the deeply branching bacteria are Chlorflexi, Deinococcus-Thermus, and Aquificae. What are their ...

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by wildfunguy
Sat Oct 19, 2013 6:12 pm
 
Forum: Microbiology
Topic: Bacterial Taxonomy
Replies: 3
Views: 1639

Re:

... on origin of life. This is one fresh discovery. A group of viruses (mimivirus) have given rise to the three different domains of life i.e., archaea, prokarya(bacteria) and eukarya. I'm sorry for moving your post to the second-to-last page, especially since it is more on the topic.

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by wildfunguy
Sat Sep 28, 2013 5:33 pm
 
Forum: Evolution
Topic: Theories - Origin of Life
Replies: 559
Views: 760134
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