Dictionary » A » Amino acid

Amino acid

Definition

noun, plural: amino acids

(1) A molecule consisting of the basic amino group (NH2), the acidic carboxylic group (COOH), a hydrogen atom (-H), and an organic side group (R) attached to the carbon atom, thus, having the basic formula of NH2CHRCOOH.

(2) The building block of protein in which each is coded for by a codon and linked together through peptide bonds.


Supplement

There are over 100 amino acids that have been found to occur naturally; each of them differs in R group. Twenty of them are involved in making up a protein, and are classified as whether they are non-essential or essential. Non-essential or dispensable amino acids are synthesized in the body. They are alanine, arginine, aspartic acid, asparagine, cysteine, glutamic acid, glutamine, glycine, proline, serine, and tyrosine. Essential or indispensable amino acids cannot be synthesized in the body and can only be obtained through food. They are histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan, and valine.


Related phrases: essential amino acid, nonessential amino acid, basic amino acid, polar amino acid, amino acid transmitter, amino acid permease, nonpolar amino acid, dibasic amino acid, alpha-amino acid.

See also: imino acid.


Please contribute to this project, if you have more information about this term feel free to edit this page



Results from our forum


Newbie question about the first life

... started to come together and assemble polymers. These were 1) nucleic acids, which now both carry and pass on hereditary information, and 2) proteins, ... (biocatalysts). An example of this would be the synthesis of the amino acid serine in the primitive atmosphere, thus: two molecules of formaldehyde ...

See entire post
by piscilactovegetarian
Tue Feb 25, 2014 10:21 am
 
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: Newbie question about the first life
Replies: 14
Views: 8422

Re: When does gluconeogenesis kick in during physical activity?

... tissues where is it utilised. And it uses alanine as the solely amino acid, because it's freely exchangeable with pyruvate and lactate.

See entire post
by JackBean
Fri Dec 13, 2013 12:14 pm
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: When does gluconeogenesis kick in during physical activity?
Replies: 12
Views: 5502

Chymotrypsin

... specific points around the carboxy terminal ends of a large hydrophobic amino acid (like tyrosine, tryptophan, and phenylalanine). Chymotrypsin molecules can also cleave ...

See entire post
by supersapien
Mon Dec 02, 2013 9:29 am
 
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: Chymotrypsin
Replies: 1
Views: 1130

Re: Please help me figure this out

... such question, you should already know how many nucleotides code for an amino acid! :twisted:

See entire post
by JackBean
Wed Oct 30, 2013 10:46 am
 
Forum: Cell Biology
Topic: Please help me figure this out
Replies: 4
Views: 1146

Please help me figure this out

For this you need to know how many nucleotides code for one amino acid. Do you?

See entire post
by JackBean
Tue Oct 22, 2013 8:45 am
 
Forum: Cell Biology
Topic: Please help me figure this out
Replies: 4
Views: 1146
View all matching forum results

This page was last modified 07:26, 5 August 2008. This page has been accessed 149,543 times. 
What links here | Related changes | Permanent link