Login

Join for Free!
118477 members

A Manual of Acupuncture by P. Deadman et al.

A Manual of Acupuncture  

   

AUTHORS: 

  • Peter Deadman 
  • Kevin Baker
  • Mazin Al-Khafaji  

PRODUCT DETAILS:

  • Hardcover: 670 pages
  • Publisher: Not Avail (June 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN: 0951054678
  • Product Dimensions: 2.2 x 8.5 x 11.0 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.00 pounds
EDITORIAL REVIEWS

Book Description 

Once in a great while an extraordinary book is published that sets an entirely new standard in its field. A Manual of Acupuncture, published by Journal of Chinese Medicine Publications, is just such a book. Painstakingly researched over many years by Peter Deadman, editor-in-chief of The Journal of Chinese Medicine, and colleagues Mazin Al-Khafaji and Kevin Baker, this book is certain to become the primary reference in the West for the study of acupuncture points and channels.

Introductory chapters describe and illustrate the channels and collaterals, the various categories of points, and methods of selection, location, and needling. Ensuing chapters present each of the points of the 14 channels as well as the extra (miscellaneous) points, identified by their English and pinyin names, and Chinese characters. Each point is located in accordance with the most exacting anatomical standards to be found in any Western textbook.

For each point there is a dedicated drawing, followed by regional body drawings. The quality of the 500 drawings is far superior to those in any other TCM text. There are also practical pointers for finding and needling the points, and cautionary information about what to avoid. In addition to point indexes by their English and pinyin names, there is an index identifying every part of the body reached by each of the channels, and separate indexes of point indications listed according to both TCM and biomedical symptoms.  

About the Author(s)

Peter Deadman studied acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine in England and China, and for the past 20 years has been in private practice in Brighton, England. In 1979 he founded The Journal of Chinese Medicine which he edits, writes for, and publishes. He has also been a teacher of acupuncture and Chinese medicine, and has lectured widely throughout the United Kingdom, Europe, Israel, Australia, and the United States.

Mazin Al-Khafaji studied acupuncture in England and China, followed by intensive studies in modern and medical Chinese in Taiwan. In 1987 he graduated as a Doctor of Chinese Medicine from the Shanghai College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, and has since been in private practice in Brighton where he specializes in dermatology. Dr. Al-Khafaji is also a frequent lecturer in Chinese medicine in the United Kingdom and Europe.

Kevin Baker qualified in Medicine at Cambridge University and St. George's Hospital Medical School in 1979, subsequently specializing in Accident and Emergency Medicine and Surgery. He became a member of the Royal College of Physicians in London in 1983, and a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons in Edinburgh in 1986. Thereafter, he pursued studies in acupuncture in England and China, which he currently practices in addition to psychotherapy and general medicine. 

 

CUSTOMER REVIEWS

Better than Chinese Texts, March 30, 2003

This is the only text that I have on the subject of acupuncture. I am not a practitioner, but had hoped that this one (expensive) text would be sufficient to give me a total foundation in the discipline and would eventually allow me to use acupressure or some rudiments of the field in my own efforts to promote good health.

I was a little dissappointed that the introductory and foundational material was lacking in the book, and that there were no separate sections on diagnosis or expositions of the nature of pathogens. The book is essentially a description of each and every one of the 360 or so primary acupuncture points of Traditional Chinese Medicine. There is a good bit of material about methodology of point selection, but the real gem of this book is the intelligent and thorough descriptions of the points, their properties, and how to locate and needle them. The reason that I gave the book five stars is that it is far more complete and logical in its point descriptions than any of the Chinese texts used by my acupuncturist, a Chinese chiropractor who was a medical doctor Shanghai for eight years before coming to the US and becoming a chiropractor. Often when a discipline is translated from one language and culture to another, the highly systematized translation is more complete and sensible than the eclectic literature corpus upon which it is based. Those who devised this book have created a phenomenally comprehensive synthesis of over 3,000 years of Chinese medical tradition. They have taken on a monumental task and succeeded brilliantly. The quality of this reference is so high that I would even recommend it to practitioners from the orient who are coming to the US or other English-speaking countries to start a practice. First, it will it help them learn the English vocabulary of acupuncture jargon and help them understand our butchered pronunciations of the many Chinese words in an English acupuncturist's vocabulary. Second, they will be able to better communicate their activities to their patients. Finally, the book is as high a quality reference as anything they will have brought with them from Asia.

 


Rating: not rated | Added on: 20 Oct 2006

Rate this book:







excellent!bad…