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Biological Science (2nd Edition) by S. Freeman

Biological Science (2nd Edition)  

   

AUTHORS: 

  • Scott Freeman

PRODUCT DETAILS:

  • Hardcover: 1392 pages
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall; 2 edition (December 28, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN: 0131409417
  • Product Dimensions: 2.0 x 9.2 x 11.0 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.18 pounds


EDITORIAL REVIEWS

Book Description

Infused with the spirit of inquiry, Freeman's Biological Science helps teach readers the fundamentals while introducing them to the excitement that drives the science. By presenting unifying concepts and methods of analysis, this book helps its readers learn to think like biologists and gives them the tools they need for success in understanding more advanced subjects. Volume I of a nine-part organization covers topics under the general headings of: the origin and early evolution of life, cell functions, gene structure and expression, developmental biology, evolutionary patterns and processes, the diversification of life, how plants work, how animals work, and ecology. For science enthusiasts who want to be inspired with a sense of wonder and excitement that makes learning about biology interesting and fun. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From the Back Cover

Infused with the spirit of inquiry, Freeman's Biological Science helps teach readers the fundamentals while introducing them to the excitement that drives the science. By presenting unifying concepts and methods of analysis, this book helps its readers learn to think like biologists and gives them the tools they need for success in understanding more advanced subjects. Volume 2 of a nine-part organization covers topics under the general headings of: the origin and early evolution of life, cell functions, gene structure and expression, developmental biology, evolutionary patterns and processes, the diversification of life, how plants work, how animals work, and ecology. For science enthusiasts who want to be inspired with a sense of wonder and excitement that makes learning about biology interesting and fun. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.  

About the Author(s)

Scott Freeman received his Ph.D. in Zoology from the University of Washington and was nominated for an Excellence in Teaching Award in 1989. He was subsequently awarded an Albert Sloan Postdoctoral Fellowship in Molecular Evolution at Princeton University to investigate how generation time affects the rate of molecular evolution. Dr. Freeman's research publications explore a range of topics from the behavioral ecology of nest parasitism to the molecular systematics of the blackbird family. As an affiliate faculty member at the University of Washington, he has taught courses in evolution and has played an active role in the redesign of the general biology course. He is currently teaching the majors general biology course using an inquiry-based approach that emphasizes the logic of experimental design and the mastery of core concepts required for success in upper-level courses. Dr. Freeman is the co-author of Evolutionary Analysis, which presents evolutionary principles in the same spirit of inquiry that drives research.

 

CUSTOMER REVIEWS

too much focus on experiments that certain details are not explained as well., December 15, 2005

After acing Introductory Bio the previous year with Campbell & Reece's Biology, I returned this year as an undergrad TA for the same class. The professor had switched to this book, which is by far just a piece of crap next to the Campbell & Reece book.

This textbook seems to put too much emphasis on experiments done in the past that all the material is lost beneath piles and piles of experimental 'abstracts'. I once misunderstood the textbook, specifically on the differences between genes important in developmental biology, and ended up giving wrong information on a Q&A session. I ended up having to spend a lot of time tracking down every single person who had come to the session in order to let them know about the error.

Now I say Campbell & Reece is better because it makes better use of its diagrams and figures in order to clarify points made in the text itself. Freeman does not do as good of a job in this way. I guess it does a mediocre job of enabling you to delve out relationships between experimental results and conclusions that have been deduced from those experiments. But for one who is studying introductory biology I, I do not personally see the purpose of looking at experimental data just yet. With all the definitions and concepts that need to be understood first, the emphasis should not be as much on experiments than on developing concepts and throwing in experiments every once in a while.
 

 

Rating: 3.7 | Added on: 10 Oct 2006

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