Search found 358 matches

by kotoreru
Mon Apr 16, 2007 6:08 pm
Forum: Zoology Discussion
Topic: The diseases of Pinnipeds
Replies: 2
Views: 3442

Hmm yes, a Google search in this case is vaguely useless, "pinniped necropsy" being doubly so - but thanks for your suggestions. I think the key to this is to consider parasites as diseases...that should yield some answers. This is where one wishes there was a book called "Infections ...
by kotoreru
Mon Apr 16, 2007 4:05 pm
Forum: Zoology Discussion
Topic: The diseases of Pinnipeds
Replies: 2
Views: 3442

The diseases of Pinnipeds

I wonder if I may be so fortunate enough to be in the company of someone who knows anything about pinniped diseases? I know a little about Phocine Distemper Virus, and its close relative the Canine Distemper Virus, but other than that I really have no clue about other diseases that affect pinnipeds....
by kotoreru
Sun Apr 15, 2007 4:47 pm
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: Simple DNA question
Replies: 5
Views: 2633

Yes, presumably the double helix would never separate into the two discrete strands under any natural circumstances. Am I right in saying that during the denaturing phase i.e. the heating part of the PCR (sorry about my ignorance of the terminology), the two strands of any given 'molecule' of DNA wi...
by kotoreru
Sat Apr 14, 2007 1:38 pm
Forum: Zoology Discussion
Topic: Heart rate and emitted sound frequency of carp's hearbeat
Replies: 6
Views: 4802

I thought I'd wait a bit and see if anyone answered this, but as they havent they must be thinking the same as me: this is a logistical nightmare. I'd probably try to read up a bit of human ultrasound techniques to get started - an easy search in google - if you really wanted to pursue this. Very ni...
by kotoreru
Sat Apr 14, 2007 1:33 pm
Forum: Cell Biology
Topic: organelles (both plant and animal)
Replies: 11
Views: 8643

You can remove the ribosomes from the rough endoplasmic reticulum and the cell will still function well, if I recall. I could be wrong though. Obviously you still need ribosomes in the cell though.
by kotoreru
Fri Apr 13, 2007 5:54 pm
Forum: Zoology Discussion
Topic: Dinosaurs homeostasis
Replies: 5
Views: 6581

er...

Well, endothermy does.
by kotoreru
Fri Apr 13, 2007 5:42 pm
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: Imagination about electrophoresis
Replies: 7
Views: 5487

Re: Imagination about electrophoresis

Tae Jun, Yoon wrote: But most cells in our body has no telomerase as far as I know....


I'm not a molecular biologist, but I'm fairly sure that telomerase is quite ubiquitous in our cells - without it surely our cell divisions would soon reduce our chromosomes' length unacceptably.

Am I wrong?
by kotoreru
Fri Apr 13, 2007 10:13 am
Forum: Zoology Discussion
Topic: What animals are known for their taste and touch?
Replies: 10
Views: 19357

Ah actually yes it could have Life of Mammals...cant remember about it being venomous though. They did an excellent 'reconstruction' of what it may be like to 'see' with touch.
by kotoreru
Thu Apr 12, 2007 10:15 pm
Forum: Evolution
Topic: Natural selection or Genetic mutation?
Replies: 11
Views: 5916

You dont need mutation for selection; selection simply acts on the variation present in a population...and variation isnt neccessarily a result of mutation (without sounding or getting too pedantic). Mutation is a fact - its easy to prove. Selection also is fact - again, easy to prove: take a random...
by kotoreru
Thu Apr 12, 2007 9:31 pm
Forum: Zoology Discussion
Topic: What animals are known for their taste and touch?
Replies: 10
Views: 19357

I seem to remember a fascinating video about a water vole/shrew (or similar) that uses its paws to feel underwater rocks for likelihood of harbouring insects. I believe this was made obvious by direct observation and also an obvious enlargement of the part of the brain associated with touch (a bit o...