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magnetic field and bone density

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magnetic field and bone density

Postby Roan » Thu Jan 24, 2008 8:56 pm

Hello,
I have heard talk of reserch being conducted on magnetic fields and their effect on the human body, I have heard that a strong magnetic field would cause higher bone density allong side other benefits in humans and animals subjected to it. I am skeptical about this, and would appreciate any feedback

-Roan
I find the biology of lesser spiecies fascenating..... thats why I study humans :twisted:

-Roan
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Postby MrMistery » Fri Jan 25, 2008 3:36 am

not to be johnny raincloud, but why would higher bone density be better? I mean it would disturb the Haversian structure, which can't be good if you ask me.
And sorry, I don't see any correlation between magnetism and bone, as there is no Iron, nickel or lead in bone...
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter
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Re: magnetic field and bone density

Postby Roan » Fri Jan 25, 2008 4:54 am

yyyeaaahhh, here on earth higher bone density wouldn't do crap, but if your on a prolonged space flight it might prove usefull
I find the biology of lesser spiecies fascenating..... thats why I study humans :twisted:

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Postby MichaelXY » Fri Jan 25, 2008 5:37 am

Magnetism would have no effect on any metal other than Iron.
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Postby mith » Fri Jan 25, 2008 5:49 am

wrong, magnets affect everything paramagnetic. Try pouring oxygen through a magnet.
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Re: magnetic field and bone density

Postby MichaelXY » Fri Jan 25, 2008 6:45 am

Well shoot, you learn something new all the time. I never heard of that before, but it makes sense, and I looked it up. I guess that will teach me :oops:
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Postby mith » Fri Jan 25, 2008 7:58 am

beating a dead horse some more

surely you've heard of cobalt being used to make magnets or neodymium or rare earth metal magnets?
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Postby MrMistery » Fri Jan 25, 2008 8:18 am

a little update: my memory is bad. the three metals which are traditionally known to be attracted to magnets are Iron, Cobalt and Nickel(not Lead).
I have also read of liquid Oxygen has magnetic properties(not known exactly why), and heard of some weird carbon nanotubes with magnetic properties. But from there to saying magnets affect everything, i don't know...
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Postby MichaelXY » Fri Jan 25, 2008 7:41 pm

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Re:

Postby JackBean » Tue Jan 25, 2011 7:17 am

MrMistery wrote:I have also read of liquid Oxygen has magnetic properties(not known exactly why)

that's because oxygen is paramagnetic. Although it has even number of electrons, they are not paired.
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

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