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Why is Bright's disease difficult to treat?

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Why is Bright's disease difficult to treat?

Postby Nahashta » Tue Dec 11, 2007 3:44 am

I need this answer really quickly and it is killing me! GAH! Please help!
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Postby mith » Tue Dec 11, 2007 4:15 am

Because it actually doesn't exist.
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Postby MrMistery » Tue Dec 11, 2007 6:09 pm

i thought it was some kind of Morgellons.
According to wiki it does exist, only that the name is a bit old.. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bright%27s_disease
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter
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Bright's Disease

Postby D_GILL911 » Thu Dec 20, 2007 3:34 am

Bright's Disease is an older classification for different forms of kidney disease. It was named after Dr. Richard Bright, who described the condition in the early 19th century. Lack of understabreinding of kidney function naturally meant that several different conditions could be considered Bright's Disease. These include inflammation of the kidney, commonly called nephritis. Inflammation may be the result of too much protein being shed through the kidneys, called proteinuria, or hematuria, which causes blood in the urine. As well, Bright's Disease might describe kidney failure due to high blood pressure or retention of fluids.

Those symptoms most commonly associated with Bright's Disease were intense pain on either or both sides of the lower back. Fever might be present and intense edema, or retention of fluids, might cause the extremities to appear extremely swollen. Breath could be labored and difficult, particularly if kidney failure caused fluid to accumulate in the lungs, or was caused by metastasized cancer.

Analysis of urine in diagnosing Bright's Disease might show extremely cloudy, dark or bloody urine. Those affected might also find eating difficult, or might have periods of nausea or vomiting. All of the symptoms meant a very serious disease, which was usually not treatable, particularly in the 19th century.

Some types of kidney inflammation might be treated if they were not indicative of progressive kidney illness. Some people suffered attacks that could respond to early diuretics or laxatives. Physicians might also propose special diets, but this was still relatively uncommon.

Those with progressive kidney disease labeled as Bright's Disease usually did not respond to treatments, which might also include bloodletting, and the treatments above. Those unresponsive to treatment were simply unlucky to be born in a time when medical knowledge was minimal. Current treatments for kidney failure of various types, like kidney transplant or dialysis, can significantly lengthen the lives of those who would once have been diagnosed with Bright's Disease.
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Postby canalon » Thu Dec 20, 2007 4:06 pm

D_Gill911:
source?
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any proof. (Ashley Montague)
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