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does eating too much sweets cause diabetes?

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does eating too much sweets cause diabetes?

Postby jackson6612 » Wed Nov 07, 2007 6:57 pm

Most people say that eating too much sweets doesn't cause diabetes. But it can cause obesity which in turn can cause type 2 diabetes.

I say, eating too much sweets and carbohydrates can cause diabetes. Sweets are full of sucrose. The carbohydrates are immediately broken down into glucose when eaten and quickly enter the bloodstream. That means eating too many carbohydrates and sweets at once cause pancreas to release larger than normal amounts of insulin to regulate high blood sugar levels. When these types of foods are consumed on a regular basis, pancreas would become over-worked and would ultimately fail to function properly. This would lead to diabetes. Am I correct?
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Postby mith » Wed Nov 07, 2007 7:29 pm

There's types of diabetes, for example type 1 is not induced, white type 2 might be.
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Postby victor » Wed Nov 07, 2007 10:56 pm

I ever read an article that when pancreas (the beta-cell) is forced to synthesize so much insulin, they will die slowly because too many reactive oxigen species inside those cells. I think it's because of they overmetabolze the insulin.
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Postby biohazard » Mon Nov 12, 2007 2:16 pm

I thik the prevailing opinion among most of the researchers is that the type I diabetes is an autoimmune response towards pancreatic beta cells. The reason for this is unknown, but could be e.g. certain viral infections that today happen too late in a child's life, rendering them susceptible to autoimmunity - however, the underlying mechanisms are complex, since a small portion of people develope type I diabetes, despite most of (the Western) people live in fairly similar environments. Genetics surely plays a part. However, as far as I know, sweets - or the sugar in them does not.

What comes to type II diabetes, again, it's not the sugar (/sweets) itself that causes the disease - rather, it's a combination of life style aspects, where sugar is one cause due to its tendency to make people obese - and obesity in turn is a major risk factor for type II

People can develop both types of diabetes without excessive use of sugar.
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Postby raghda » Thu Nov 15, 2007 10:50 pm

we can suffer from diabetes if all the glucose amount is absored once .but the fact that the rate of absortion of glucose is 1gm/1kgm body weight/1hour . so the amount of glucose in blood depend on weight ,this mechanism protect our pancrease
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Postby mcar » Sat Nov 24, 2007 2:49 pm

Regulation in eating sweets is important. Eating does not means it will cause the disease--it enhances the effects of the disease. Genetic factors play a role why diabetes is evident.
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Re: does eating too much sweets cause diabetes?

Postby Amaru » Mon Feb 01, 2010 7:04 am

i have a history of diabetes that runs to my family. but i am in to sweets and carb. am i still prone to diabetes? what should i do to prevent this thanks?
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Postby biohazard » Mon Feb 01, 2010 7:35 am

Do you mean your family has a history of type I or type II diabetes?

For type I there is not much you can do, your genes are what they are and the triggering events usually happen in early childhood (e.g. eating cow milk-based formula, which seems to be one risk factor) most likely combined with other events such as certain viral infections. If one of your parents or siblings has type I diabetes, the chances are you also carry the risk genes and may develop the condition. However, it is more likely that you do not get it than that you get it - only a small % of genetically susceptible persons develop type I diabetes.

Type II diabetes, on the other hand, is quite straightforward to prevent: keep your BMI resonable (normal weight or around it) and do aerobic exercise two to three times a week. That alone is enough to prevent majority of type II diabetes cases...

If you still have hypertension and/or high blood cholesterol levels despite exercise and normal BMI, your physician may prescribe you medication for those. But usually even those can usually be managed by proper diet and physical activity. Eating carbohydrates (including sweets) does not cause diabetes alone, just don't go over the top with them.
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Postby JackBean » Mon Feb 01, 2010 9:02 am

Do not care about him, he's just spammer, who added some link and add some blah to be noteless
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Postby biohazard » Mon Feb 01, 2010 10:20 am

Ah, thanks for pointing that out. Didn't notice that removed link there. Well, hopefully the answer was useful for someone who actually needs information :)
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Re: does eating too much sweets cause diabetes?

Postby linalcal » Sat Feb 20, 2010 4:35 pm

jackson6612 wrote:Most people say that eating too much sweets doesn't cause diabetes. But it can cause obesity which in turn can cause type 2 diabetes.

I say, eating too much sweets and carbohydrates can cause diabetes. Sweets are full of sucrose. The carbohydrates are immediately broken down into glucose when eaten and quickly enter the bloodstream. That means eating too many carbohydrates and sweets at once cause pancreas to release larger than normal amounts of insulin to regulate high blood sugar levels. When these types of foods are consumed on a regular basis, pancreas would become over-worked and would ultimately fail to function properly. This would lead to diabetes. Am I correct?


I think you may be correct. When blood glucose level rises, especially after a meal of sweets, the pancreas secretes the hormone insulin into the blood (Insulin enhances the transport of glucose to body cells and stimulates the liver and muscle cells to store glucose as glycogen). Therefore, the pancreas probably would become overworked and end up using all of its insulin in order to transport all that glucose to cells in the body and stimulate the liver and muscle cells to store it as glycogen.

However, eating too many carbohydrates is not a bad thing. It's eating the simple carbohydrates that's bad. Complex carbs are fine. Therefore, I believe that it's eating too many simple carbs, such as sweets and junk food, that causes diabetes.
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Postby mith » Sun Feb 21, 2010 5:05 am

Actually overworking doesn't make sense, most of the systems in our body compensate for increased demands, for example muscles grow larger, brains develop due to stimulation, liver increases enzyme productions due to increased alcohol leading to tolerance. You'd have to claim the overworking actually damaged the cells. In any case, running out of insulin would be a one time thing. A more likely answer is the increased sugar levels epigenetically change gene expression of some cells.
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