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PROS to EMBRYONIC stem cell research

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PROS to EMBRYONIC stem cell research

Postby GameQ » Fri Feb 11, 2005 7:32 pm

Hello All,
I am a High School Senior doing a research on the stem cell research, more specifically embryonic stem cells versus adult stem cells. I know you probably get allot of homework help questions, but this seems to be my last resort. I need to find out what the good side to embryonic stem cell research is.

In every article I find, I get the same exact conclusion: Embryonic stem cells "are genetically unstable in long term culture, and are especially prone to chromosomal abnormalities." Dr. Mae-Wan Ho: Adult versus Embryonic Stem Cells

and then: "By contrast, adult stem cells could be transplanted directly without genetic modification or pre-treatments. They simply differentiate according to cues from the surrounding tissues and do not give uncontrollable growth or tumours. The adult stem cells also show high degrees of genomic stability during culture. There is no problem with immune rejection because the cells can readily be isolated from the patients requiring transplant. " Dr. Mae-Wan Ho: Adult versus Embryonic Stem Cells

Although those quotes both come from the same source, every other source i find ends up along those same lines.

So If anyone can give me examples of why embryonic stem cells are better then adult stem cells, i would be much obliged, and i'll be sure to credit your words.

Thank you.
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Postby mith » Fri Feb 11, 2005 8:38 pm

wow....I just did a debate on that and I'm surprised. If you've looked at both wikipedia or the National Institute of Health website, you get more info. For one, embryonic cells are the only known totipotent/pluripotent cells. They can be used to make many more different differentiated cells. Adult stem cells can only be used in limited applications for now. Also adult stem cells are rarely found and are hard to coax to reproduce while embryonic stem cells can be found easily.
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Postby thank.darwin » Mon Feb 14, 2005 9:37 pm

Embryonic stem cells are easily grown in culture... they are also pluripotent (can become all cell types of the body) and adult stem cells are only able to differentiate into different cell types of their tissue of origin (adult stem cell plasticity may exist). Another big thing is that embryonic stem cells are rejected by the patients own immune system, while on the other hand, adult stem cells would not be rejected.
No amount of experimentation can ever prove me right; a single experiment can prove me wrong.
-Albert Einstein
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Postby elkriverdad » Thu Jun 02, 2005 5:09 am

thank.darwin wrote:Embryonic stem cells are easily grown in culture... they are also pluripotent (can become all cell types of the body) and adult stem cells are only able to differentiate into different cell types of their tissue of origin (adult stem cell plasticity may exist). Another big thing is that embryonic stem cells are rejected by the patients own immune system, while on the other hand, adult stem cells would not be rejected.


I am wondering how adult stem cells would not be rejected. The are hard to find and if they are a foreign body they could be rejected. Does a person have enough stem cells fo their own that they could be isolated and therefore be used as an autologous graft.
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Postby Waters2 » Thu Jun 02, 2005 5:34 am

Embryonic stem cells possess two properties that make them especially well suited for cell therapy. First, because embryonic stem cells are obtained from early blastocysts, they are at early developmental stage, and retain the flexibility to become any one of the more than 180(estimate) cell types that make up the human body. For the right combination of signals, embryonic stem cells will develop into mature cells that can function as neurons or other needed cell types. Stem cells with such flexibility are described as pluripotent, to indicate their high potential to differentiate into a wide variety of cell types.
A second feature of embryonic stem cells is their ability to remain in an undifferentiated state and to divide indefinitely. This property of self-renewal :? means that essentially unlimited numbers of identical, well-defined, genetically and genomically characterized stem cells can be produced in culture for medical use.
Embryonic stem cells technology have a potential to treat the diabetes, Parkinson's diease and spinal cord injury.( Search National institutes of health website)
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NJ Stem Cell Research

Postby lildreamer24 » Mon Jun 13, 2005 1:55 pm

As a resident of New Jersey, I am very proud of the state's upcoming efforts to advance the field of stem cell research. Under NJ's Stem Cell Bond Initiative, a $230 million will go to finance stem cell research grants. Stem cell research is an important and vital asset to Americans. It is our best hope today to cure diseases such as Alzheimer's, juvenile diabetes, and cancer. I urge the people of NJ to let the voters decide and not the NJ State legislature. This is a matter crucial to all of the people of NJ and should be left in their hands to decide.
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Postby biostudent84 » Mon Jun 13, 2005 6:12 pm

viewtopic.php?t=68&highlight=kyles

It's a bit long, I know. But if you are looking at the ethical side to it, this will answer some questions.
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