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Evolution trend in parthenogenesis reproductive strategies

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Evolution trend in parthenogenesis reproductive strategies

Postby sole_05 » Fri May 20, 2005 4:43 pm

Since parthenogenesis is common in plants, moderately common in invertebrate animals, occasionally reported in fish, frogs and lizards, but never reported in birds and mammals.
I just want to speculate on why this evolutionary trend may have occurred.


I actually did a search on PubMed and there are numerous papers stating the occurence of parthenogenesis in turkeys. It does seem that parthenogenesis only occurs in mammals after human influence, though.

Or maybe this may have evolved to keep a wide variety in offspring. Males make up so many of the mammal and bird species so it would be a waste of individuals if the males were not needed.

Any comments or thoughts on this would help shed lights on this issue.

sole. :idea:
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Postby sole_05 » Sat May 21, 2005 2:45 am

Hello! Would there be anyone interesting in sharing with regard to parthenogenesis?

need some thoughts on this! any piece of thought would help.

happy discussion.
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Postby mith » Sat May 21, 2005 3:14 pm

Parthenogenesis might favor species which have more offspring than which survive(r specialists). Organisms such as insects would do this but mammals are k specialists
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Re: Evolution trend in parthenogenesis reproductive strategi

Postby asusor » Sat Jun 11, 2005 2:56 pm

in mammals is possible experimentaly induced parthenogenesis [ionomicine than 6DMAP]but embryos developing only to stage of blastocyste, probably because missing of parental genome in imprinting proces


sole_05 wrote:Since parthenogenesis is common in plants, moderately common in invertebrate animals, occasionally reported in fish, frogs and lizards, but never reported in birds and mammals.
I just want to speculate on why this evolutionary trend may have occurred.


I actually did a search on PubMed and there are numerous papers stating the occurence of parthenogenesis in turkeys. It does seem that parthenogenesis only occurs in mammals after human influence, though.

Or maybe this may have evolved to keep a wide variety in offspring. Males make up so many of the mammal and bird species so it would be a waste of individuals if the males were not needed.

Any comments or thoughts on this would help shed lights on this issue.

sole. :idea:
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Re: Evolution trend in parthenogenesis reproductive strategi

Postby asusor » Sat Jun 11, 2005 3:10 pm

I was reading those publication about parthenogenesis and turkeys but result is similar as with mammals parthenogenic embryos - degenerating soon after resumption of mitosis


sole_05 wrote:Since parthenogenesis is common in plants, moderately common in invertebrate animals, occasionally reported in fish, frogs and lizards, but never reported in birds and mammals.
I just want to speculate on why this evolutionary trend may have occurred.


I actually did a search on PubMed and there are numerous papers stating the occurence of parthenogenesis in turkeys. It does seem that parthenogenesis only occurs in mammals after human influence, though.

Or maybe this may have evolved to keep a wide variety in offspring. Males make up so many of the mammal and bird species so it would be a waste of individuals if the males were not needed.

Any comments or thoughts on this would help shed lights on this issue.

sole. :idea:
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