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mutation of psb

Discussion of all aspects of biological molecules, biochemical processes and laboratory procedures in the field.

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mutation of psb

Postby mslynnlynn » Sat May 12, 2007 8:07 am

mutagenesis of PSB by NTG can have significant effect?
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Postby david23 » Sat May 12, 2007 4:27 pm

NTG - nitrosoguanidine (N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine - MNNG) modify bases and/or phosphates by alkylating them. The DNA becomes distorted as a result and the ability of proteins to recognize and bind correctly is hindered.

I know what NTG is, but what is PSB, not everyone is familiar with these abbreviations
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Postby mslynnlynn » Sun May 13, 2007 4:56 am

thank u for ur reply.
psb mean phosphate solubilizing bacteria.
what method can be used to meaure the gluconic acid concentration?
how can detect the p solubilizing activity of bacteria quantitatively?
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Postby seaseasea » Sun May 13, 2007 2:22 pm

OK. I think your question is very professional and many viewers may be unfamiliar with this. I think you could search reference database to find what you need. Hope this helps.
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Postby blcr11 » Mon May 14, 2007 6:11 pm

http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=1480073 measures p solubilization by clear-zone formation around colonies on agar plates (the agar medium must contain, in addition to the usual nutrients, an insoluble suspension of phosphate (CaPO4 perhaps) salts of some kind: a clear “halo” forms around colonies that are solubilizing the phosphate; how wide the halo is is a measure of the degree of p-solubilization activity).

http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/ab ... .tb13383.x

Comparison of two different plate (“halo”) media. Also does a quantitative solubilization assay in liquid cultures by determining the amount of CaPO4 remaining in the medium after a set incubation period using a colorimetric phosphate assay.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/quer ... med_docsum

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/quer ... s=14506853

Two papers talking about gluconic acid and p-solubiliztion. Don’t know if you have access to these journals or not. The refs given in the paper should help find a suitable assay for gluconic acid. I would guess there’s HPLC and/or spectrophotometric/colorimetric assays. Keto-glutarate, for example, is (if I remember correctly) an orcinol-positive sugar, but then so are many sugars so if it needs to be specific, there has to be some sort of separation before quantitation.
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Postby blcr11 » Tue May 15, 2007 6:58 pm

That should've been keto-glucuronate, not glutarate (which may or may not be orcinol-positive, but isn't a sugar anyway).
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