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plant reproduction

Genetics as it applies to evolution, molecular biology, and medical aspects.

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plant reproduction

Postby MIA6 » Mon Apr 09, 2007 12:42 am

1. Grafting permits the groweer to combine desirable characteristics of two plant varieties in a single plant. For example, the stock may have roots which are resistant to soil pests, whereas the scion may bear a desirable kind of fruit. However, there is no mixing of the heredity of the scion and stock. I feel very confused about these two sentences. It tells us that it can get the good characteristic, but it says there is no 'mixing' of heredity? what does it mean by mixing heredity of scion and stock? Hope you can explain it to me.
2. Is cross-pollination a sexual reproduction? I think so because it uses the male gametes and female gamete?

Thanks for answering.
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Postby mith » Mon Apr 09, 2007 2:08 am

Think of building a robot, you can have wheels which are good for moving and you can still have laser beams too :). It doesn't necessarily have to be from the same kit, as long as the parts somehow integrate together.
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Postby CoffeaRobusta » Mon Apr 09, 2007 5:00 am

It's like transplanting a pig heart into a human body. The human may have children but the children won't have pig hearts. Mixing the heredity means mixing the genes. In grafting the genes remain in the separate parts.

Cross-pollination is sexual reproduction.
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