Login

Join for Free!
114788 members


Senescence & Cancer

Discussion of all aspects of cellular structure, physiology and communication.

Moderator: BioTeam

Senescence & Cancer

Postby Poison » Sun Jan 02, 2005 12:57 pm

I heard that some cancer cells produce normal cells or something like that. and this is called SENESCENCE. Does anyone have any info about this?
User avatar
Poison
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 2322
Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2005 12:44 pm
Location: Turkey

Postby ERS » Thu Jan 13, 2005 4:12 am

senescene usually refers to aging in plants. could you define your question a little better, if there is another definition you were thinking of?
ERS
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 137
Joined: Thu Dec 16, 2004 5:13 am

Postby Poison » Thu Jan 13, 2005 4:08 pm

senescence means aging (not only in plants). As we know, cancer cells are immortal. but I heard that some cancer cells may produce normal cells or act like something like that and there are some researchs on this subject. but as this is a new subject i couldn't find any info. probably a PhD student ( on molecular oncology) may help me.
thanks...
User avatar
Poison
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 2322
Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2005 12:44 pm
Location: Turkey


Postby 2810712 » Sat Jan 22, 2005 5:24 am

If there is a genetic reason for this senescence , it may be possible for us to induce aging in cancerous cells [ cure on cancer!!] , probably scientists are looking for the same.
hsg
2810712
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 697
Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2005 12:19 pm

Postby mith » Sat Jan 22, 2005 6:03 am

Very interesting!
User avatar
mith
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 5345
Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2005 8:14 pm
Location: Nashville, TN

Postby Poison » Sun Jan 23, 2005 9:23 am

2810713 wrote:If there is a genetic reason for this senescence , it may be possible for us to induce aging in cancerous cells [ cure on cancer!!] , probably scientists are looking for the same.
hsg


Yes thats it. I know that gene control has an important role on senescence. unlike normal cells cancer cells netither become senescent nor goes through apoptosis. As much as I know researchers try to induce senescence and apoptosis in cancer cells.
But do all cancer cells form (by dividing) other cancer cells? Or are there any exceptions?
User avatar
Poison
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 2322
Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2005 12:44 pm
Location: Turkey

Postby mith » Sun Jan 23, 2005 8:44 pm

have you researched the hela line?
User avatar
mith
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 5345
Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2005 8:14 pm
Location: Nashville, TN

Postby Poison » Sun Jan 23, 2005 9:07 pm

I have heard about it. But I do not know exactly. Can you give some info about that?
Thanx
User avatar
Poison
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 2322
Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2005 12:44 pm
Location: Turkey

Postby DevGrp » Wed Jan 26, 2005 12:50 pm

Normal (non-cancerous) cells can divide only a limited number of times (something like 50) before they become senescence. Tumour cells can over come this limit and can continue dividing. They are said to be "immortal". One possible mechanism (there are multiple mechanisms) for the limit on cell division in normal cells is the length of the chromosomal telomeres. Telomeres are the regions at the end of the chromosome which don't appear to code for any known genes. During each cell division the telomeres get shorter until they become very short. It has been suggested that this then exposes other genes further into the chromosome to damage / change in expression and that this causes cell senescence. Tumour cells over come this telomere shortening by producing an enzyme called "telomerase" which repairs the telomeres thus allowing continued division. Telomerase is currently a target in anticancer therapy research.

Immortalised cells are frequently used in biological research. The HeLa cells were isolated from a tumour growing in Henrietta Lacks who died in 1951. They are still growing in labs today.

If you isolate normal (non-tumour ) cells from human tissue (we used endothelial cells from the veins in human umbilical cords). they will only divide in the lab a limited number of times before they become senescent and die. Very occasionally (more come if you isolate cells from tumours) you will find some cells which keep on dividing. They have mutated and become immortalised in a similar way (probably) to how a tumour starts.
DevGrp
Death Adder
Death Adder
 
Posts: 82
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2005 12:32 pm
Location: UK

Postby Poison » Wed Jan 26, 2005 6:30 pm

so may I ask something?
do ALL cancer cells produce other cancer cells by dividing? or are there any exceptions that cancer cells produce normal cells?
User avatar
Poison
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 2322
Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2005 12:44 pm
Location: Turkey

Exception?

Postby 2810712 » Sat Jan 29, 2005 12:27 pm

If the tumour is due to mutation in genes then how can there be any exception unless there is something abnormal in the cell division process , or further mutation/s.

hrushikesh
2810712
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 697
Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2005 12:19 pm

Re: Exception?

Postby Poison » Sat Jan 29, 2005 5:20 pm

2810713 wrote:If the tumour is due to mutation in genes then how can there be any exception unless there is something abnormal in the cell division process , or further mutation/s.

hrushikesh


that is what I'm asking. :) can there be any further mutation or any abnormality?
User avatar
Poison
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 2322
Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2005 12:44 pm
Location: Turkey

Next

Return to Cell Biology

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests

cron