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digestion

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digestion

Postby nigel123 » Thu May 26, 2005 3:53 am

Explain some ways in which your digestive system helps protect you against many pathogenic bacteria that may have contaminated the kinds of food you eat.
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Postby clarence » Thu May 26, 2005 11:39 am

1. The parietal cells in the mucosa of the stomach secret hydrochloric acid that destroys bacteria and most toxins in stomach.

2.. The stellate reticuloendothelial (Kupffer) cells of the liver phagocytize aged red blood cells and white blood cells and some bacteria.
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Digestive system

Postby victor » Thu May 26, 2005 12:47 pm

Well, digestive system protect us for pathogenic organisms. How could it do that? :roll: Maybe I can start with the beginning which is....ventriculus (I don't know the english name :wink: ) it secretes chloride acid which will kill some bacterias that can't stand in acid surroundings (pH 2 till 3). Second, there are lymphocytes which is replicated by lymphogenose cell and their special characteristics is they contain many lysosoms which in this cell's organel, lysosoms have many hydrolyze enzymes and these enzymes are ready to hydrolyzed pathogenic bacterias.
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Postby MrMistery » Thu May 26, 2005 5:59 pm

Ok, so the HCL in your stomach has been said for a couple a times but a few things have been missed.
First of all, you got to understand what the cell wall in bacteria is made out of. It is made out of muriene(or peptidoglican, it's the same thing), which is made out of a polisaccharide and a few peptids. The polisaccharide is made out of 2 dissacharides: N-acetiglucosamine and N-acetil muramic. The bond between these 2 dissacharides is broken by an enzyme called lizozime, which is present in your saliva.
Then you have your tonsils, which produce white blood cells and act as guardians of the body
The HCL in the stomach will prevent bacterial growth(of most bacteria) and will neutralize a very small number of toxins.
This is about it, plus what was already said
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Postby canalon » Thu May 26, 2005 6:06 pm

It do not directly belong to your digestive system, but is an important part of it nonetheless: the commensal bacterial flora.
This is the non pathogenic bacteria that lives in the gut. By colonizing the surface and being highly adapted to this environment they create a highly competitive environment that eliminates most of the pathogenic bacteria. Thus protecting us.

And, but I am not sure of it (it was so long ago..) you have secreted Ig (IgG or IGM?) and the Peyer patches that also play an important role in the gut immune response. Better use those as keyword for a more complete research (for example on the free bokks at the ncbi)

HTH

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Postby MrMistery » Thu May 26, 2005 6:14 pm

Canalon wrote:And, but I am not sure of it (it was so long ago..) you have secreted Ig (IgG or IGM?) and the Peyer patches that also play an important role in the gut immune response. Better use those as keyword for a more complete research (for example on the free bokks at the ncbi)

Can you put that in English for those of us that do not speak immunology?
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Postby canalon » Thu May 26, 2005 6:24 pm

MrMistery wrote:
Canalon wrote:And, but I am not sure of it (it was so long ago..) you have secreted Ig (IgG or IGM?) and the Peyer patches that also play an important role in the gut immune response. Better use those as keyword for a more complete research (for example on the free bokks at the ncbi)

Can you put that in English for those of us that do not speak immunology?


Peyer patches: small structure in the intestine that helps recognize pathogens

IgG or IgM: Different types immuno globulins, ther are much more but IIRC it is one of those 2 that is secreted in the intestine.

NCBI is here http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=Books&itool=toolbar and you can use it to acces lots of books for free, that are much more reliable than me when it comes to immunology :wink:

Is the translation good enough? :lol:

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Postby MrMistery » Thu May 26, 2005 6:30 pm

My webster itself couldn't have said it better!
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Postby canalon » Thu May 26, 2005 6:36 pm

Ooops a short look on the web showed that I my memory was really bad. Secretd Immnuno globulins are IgA.
And for a more detailed account of the protection along the gastrointetsinal tract you can go on NCBI here.

Of course this is just a starting point 8)

Good luck

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Postby Jelanen » Thu May 26, 2005 7:00 pm

IgM is the pentamer? (been a while) I think the dimer Ig is the one used in the gut since the pentamer is the first Ig produced cause its not completely specific and the body needs the pentameric connection to an antigen to get a high enough response. Whatever stupid letter it is, I'm sure its the dimeric Ig that is the gut one (that was me CYA)

On a separate note...actually two separate notes. My graduate app is complete...I hope I get in. The other thing is that I think I may need to write up an immunology tutorial that isn't 400+ level college biology so we can have something to point to for Immuno questions....

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Postby Jelanen » Thu May 26, 2005 7:09 pm

Found it....IgA is the dimeric Ig found in the gut. Heres a linky: http://microvet.arizona.edu/Courses/MIC419/Tutorials/humoral.html

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Postby canalon » Thu May 26, 2005 7:13 pm

Thanks for that. Immunology was never my favourite. And anyway my pet bacteria do not have any immune system, so who cares? :D
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