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Animal Cells in Isotonic Solutions?

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Animal Cells in Isotonic Solutions?

Postby wiggleandawalk » Thu Nov 23, 2006 12:44 pm

Hello Peeps,

I have been given an assignment and I am struggling with the following question:-

"Explain why it is important that animal cells are kept in isotonic solutions?"

Anyone got any ideas?


Wiggle.
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Postby James » Thu Nov 23, 2006 12:49 pm

Animal cells have no cell wall.
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Postby wiggleandawalk » Thu Nov 23, 2006 12:57 pm

hey,
thanx for the reply. I realise animal cells dont have cell walls but what difference does this make. Still why is it impotant that thay are kept in isotonic solutions.

wiggle. :lol:
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Postby theman » Thu Nov 23, 2006 3:10 pm

From your studies about cells, you know that plasma membranes have many different functions. Since animal cells do not have cell walls to prevent the cell from enlarging too far, the plasma membrane must regulate the flow of ions into and out of the cell. When you look at human red blood cells in isotonic solutions on a microscope slide, the cells appear to be biconcave discs. These cells swell and burst when placed in distilled water; they shrivel in salty water. Obviously hypotonic and hypertonic solutions have an effect on animal cells.

Just as animal cells have plasma membranes that regulate the flow of ions, plant cells also have plasma membranes. In addition, plant cells have cell walls that keep the cell sizes constant.

So basically - as James said - an isotonic solution is important as it acts as a cell wall when animals cells are concerned.
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Postby wiggleandawalk » Thu Nov 23, 2006 3:16 pm

Thanx guys! That has been a great help!

:)
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Postby wiggleandawalk » Thu Nov 23, 2006 4:47 pm

Hey

i dont want to waste other peoples time in reading this question, how do i take if of the forum... because got my answer now

Please help... new to this
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Postby James » Thu Nov 23, 2006 5:13 pm

You cant, it will remain so others can search and find the answer if they have the same question.
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Postby Dr.Stein » Fri Nov 24, 2006 4:21 am

Think about osmosis ;)
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Postby Emilyroxsbiology15 » Thu Jan 06, 2011 10:51 pm

This is awesome thanks. what is isotonic??
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Postby canalon » Thu Jan 06, 2011 11:17 pm

the post is 5 years old! And the answer could be found using the dictionary of this website or the search function. Have fun.
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Science has proof without any certainty. Creationists have certainty without
any proof. (Ashley Montague)
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Postby JackBean » Fri Jan 07, 2011 1:38 pm

you don't know, what is isotonic, but yet you find it awesome? :lol:
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

Cis or trans? That's what matters.
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