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Blue green algae - plant or protozoa?

About microscopic forms of life, including Bacteria, Archea, protozoans, algae and fungi. Topics relating to viruses, viroids and prions also belong here.

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Postby Dr.Stein » Tue Oct 10, 2006 7:50 am

It is stated somewhere (in other classsification) that blue green alga locates between animal and plant. Some blue green algae which actively move e.g. Euglena will refer to animal, whereas the ones which relatively static e.g. Volvox will refer to plants.

EDIT: I made a mistake. What I wrote above is about Green Algae, NOT Blue-green Algae. Shame on me :oops: :lol: But I let that information exists for references 8)
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Thats alright

Postby geonyzl » Tue Oct 10, 2006 9:33 am

Hehehe that all right. We are not perfect we do sometimes commit mistakes. :)
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Postby mkwaje » Tue Oct 10, 2006 2:11 pm

cyanobacteria are not the ONLY bacteria capable of nitrogen fixation. Rhizobium for example fixes nitrogen in symbiosis with plants/legumes, and Azotobacter is a free-living soil bacterium capable also of nitrogen fixation.
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Postby Linn » Wed Oct 11, 2006 2:48 am

mkwaje wrote:cyanobacteria are not the ONLY bacteria capable of nitrogen fixation. Rhizobium for example fixes nitrogen in symbiosis with plants/legumes, and Azotobacter is a free-living soil bacterium capable also of nitrogen fixation.


True some do, but do they also produce oxygen?
there is prochlorobacteria, that produce oxygen, but it does not have phycobilin pigments.
nitrogen fixation is basicaly anaerobic (the opposite), so that itself is unusual, as I stated above, that cynobacteria is capable of both fixing nitrogen and producing oxygen. This is what is unique to it.

I am just saying there are so many interesting and distinct things about it. :)

http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/103/14/5442
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Postby Plymouth John » Wed Oct 11, 2006 12:12 pm

No, the cyanobacteria do not branch with or link with higher plants which are eukaryotes. Chloroplasts residing within plant cell cytoplasm are believed to have descended from ancestral cyanobacteria which formed a symbiotic (intracellular) relation with early eukaryotic cells (to enable oxygenic photosynthesis to make use of inorganic carbon in the atmosphere). This is the evolutionary link between plants and cyanobacteria, and relates to the origin of eukaryotic cells. But higher plants themselves are classified by the contents of their nuclear genomes (and the phenotypes encoded therein), and in this regard they branch next to animals in the eukaryote phylogeny, a completely different domain from bacteria in the three domain tree of life. You have broached a very big subject here, and the literature will inform you better than I can. Happy studying.
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Postby geonyzl » Mon Oct 16, 2006 5:24 am

Hmm. so they are not related eventhough they have distinct resemblance to each other?
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