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Microbiology?

About microscopic forms of life, including Bacteria, Archea, protozoans, algae and fungi. Topics relating to viruses, viroids and prions also belong here.

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Microbiology?

Postby Sepals » Fri Sep 22, 2006 8:21 pm

This is probably gonna seem like a dumb question but I'll start a unit on parastiology on Mon and it focuses on the phylum Platyhelminthes. Some of the species can be viewed in detail by an scaning electron microscope. Would this be partly mirobiological?

Microbiology is defined as: the branch of biology dealing with the structure, function, uses, and modes of existence of microscopic organisms.

I'm used to micrbiology only inc really simple organisms not belonging to the metazoa.
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Postby victor » Sat Sep 23, 2006 3:58 am

I think that Plathyhelminthes is taxonomically grouped into Phylum: Vermes which is much more complex compared to microbes..:lol: beside, you can see some differentiated complex of structure in Plathyhelminthes and also.....the important one...plathyhelminthes is multicellular organism right?
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Postby Sepals » Sat Sep 23, 2006 11:36 am

victor wrote:I think that Plathyhelminthes is taxonomically grouped into Phylum: Vermes which is much more complex compared to microbes..:lol: beside, you can see some differentiated complex of structure in Plathyhelminthes and also.....the important one...plathyhelminthes is multicellular organism right?
Platyhelmiths (spelled without the extra h in my literature) is the phylum. Also some protozoa form more than one cell. As I said these are metazoa which means they're multicellular. The definition I found on dirctionary.com would inc at least some species. I can't find my bio dictionary. When I do I'll check what it says there on microbiology.
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Postby mkwaje » Wed Sep 27, 2006 1:52 am

Well actually, platyhelminths are not microorganisms. Microorganisms include the bacteria, fungi, archaea, viruses, protozoa. Platyhelminths are considered as low forms of animals. Check on basic Zoology on pseudocoelomates and acoelomates. So this thread should go there.
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Postby Sepals » Sun Oct 01, 2006 1:25 pm

Ok. I got confused because at least some are microscopic.
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Postby Darby » Tue Oct 10, 2006 2:39 am

Microbiology generally is bacteria. The other definitions are all true, but the academic application is almost always bacteria.
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Postby MrMistery » Tue Oct 10, 2006 6:10 pm

mkwaje wrote:Well actually, platyhelminths are not microorganisms. Microorganisms include the bacteria, fungi, archaea, viruses, protozoa.


Not true about viruses, they are not microorganisms, cause they are organisms. viruses, viroids and prions are included among the subjects of microbiology study "because they are undoubtly tied to and influence the living world"
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Postby Darby » Tue Oct 10, 2006 9:13 pm

With viruses, it all depends upon whom you ask. At the intro biology level, we kind of all agree to largely ignore them as "living," (I briefly discuss what rules they break) but at higher levels, where their exceptions are less confusing and the rules-breakers are many, lots of biologists consider them organisms.

I'm agnostic, myself, mostly because what I believe about labels doesn't much matter to the viruses.
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Postby Sepals » Tue Oct 24, 2006 7:30 pm

I believe they're probably living but they're hardly organisms! Mainly a strand of DNA or RNA within a coat of protein. No comparison to a bacterial cell.
Last edited by Sepals on Tue Oct 31, 2006 1:10 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Poison » Wed Oct 25, 2006 1:39 pm

MrMistery wrote:Not true about viruses, they are not microorganisms, cause they are organisms. viruses, viroids and prions are included among the subjects of microbiology study "because they are undoubtly tied to and influence the living world"


This "microorganism" thing reminded me my microbiology prof. She include them to microorgansms. And what's more, she talks about "nucleus" of bacteria. :lol:
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Postby Sepals » Tue Oct 31, 2006 1:09 am

Poison wrote:And what's more, she talks about "nucleus" of bacteria. :lol:
Eek doesn't sound like she knows what she's talking about!
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Postby victor » Tue Oct 31, 2006 6:01 am

Poison wrote:
MrMistery wrote:Not true about viruses, they are not microorganisms, cause they are organisms. viruses, viroids and prions are included among the subjects of microbiology study "because they are undoubtly tied to and influence the living world"


This "microorganism" thing reminded me my microbiology prof. She include them to microorgansms. And what's more, she talks about "nucleus" of bacteria. :lol:


Hmmm...but I think what she said could be related also, since the appearancee of viruses is said from "retarded" small bacteria or a gene that jumped out from the evolution line and form this tiny little-like-creature... :lol:
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