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Taxonomy

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Taxonomy

Postby Ulvinnen » Tue Jul 11, 2006 1:16 pm

I am doing a correspondence course in botany and one of my tasks is to identify 10 plants according to phyla, family, genus and species.
Two of my chosen plants are lichens and now I am having trouble finding the phyla for them. Since they are symbiotic organisms of algae and fungi, what is the correct phyla for lichens? Hope anyone can help me! :D
Last edited by Ulvinnen on Wed Jul 12, 2006 1:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Doc44 » Tue Jul 11, 2006 3:28 pm

Your're having trouble classifying them????...so are the botanists and lichenologists. The continued war of the clumpers and splitters. Some still stick with "division" for plants which is the same level taxon as "Phylum" for animals. So you are not alone. Pick one; Thallophyta, mycophycota, mycophycophyta.....and defend your choice.

Maybe foliose, crustose and fruiticose forms should be in their own separate "divilums."

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Postby SU_reptile » Tue Jul 11, 2006 3:32 pm

As far as I remember phylum is a division. According to this, lichens are considered as separate division Lichenes or Mycophycophyta. Nevertheless the taxanomic position and its name depends on what system do you recognize.
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Postby Ulvinnen » Tue Jul 11, 2006 3:53 pm

Thanks for your help! Now I have more lichens problems... I miss to classify the family..I have the species name(in latin) , but nowhere can I find which family they belong to. I tried a database but they didnt include lichens..Anyone knows where I can find the family name(in latin) when I have the species name?

I think I will try to stay away from lichens for the rest of my course, LOL, but they are interesting indeed.
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Postby Ulvinnen » Tue Jul 11, 2006 7:07 pm

Ok, I found the answers I needed, in the national searchable lichen herbarium!
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Postby Poison » Wed Jul 12, 2006 5:50 am

Lichenes are classified according to fungi. So you can classify it as a divisio (Lichenes) in Fungi.
And for identification a dicotomic key can help you.

PS: oops, you found the answers? OK then...
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Postby Ulvinnen » Wed Jul 12, 2006 1:27 pm

Thanks anyway Poison...some of the problem was that I couldnt find a key for lichens:( But I finished that now:)

Now I have to develope botanical keys for 3 of my chosen plants(will stay away from the lichens this time!) . What does that mean? Is it meant that I just look at an existing key and pulls out what fit on my specie?

Sorry if I seem completely ignorant! But thats what I am! I have never had any biology in school and I also havent studied in 10 years and I have never been familiar with botany..This is all new to me!
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Postby Linn » Thu Jul 13, 2006 4:01 am

They should be a new class I think.
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Postby mkwaje » Mon Jul 17, 2006 3:38 am

Well for plants, if you are going to differentiate them from each other via a dichotomous key; I sugget you use the simplest major characteristics like shape of leaves, branching pattern, leaf venation, fruit type, etc.. You don't have to lift the characteristics from existing keys because they may not apply to your selected plants. Just remember, the rule in making a successful key is the term "dichotomous". A typical yes no characteristic. Present or absent. You can't differentiate using keys such as:
a. 4 leaf clover flowers
b. 5 leaf clover flowers

instead say,
a. 4 leaf clover flowers
b. not 4 leaf clover flowers

Good luck. Key making doesn't have to be difficult. Simplest obvious characters are always the best.
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Postby Ulvinnen » Mon Jul 17, 2006 7:19 pm

thanks for your help... could you show me an example of a key of one specific plant?
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