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The Fiber Disease

Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Medicine. Anything human!

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Postby Linn » Fri Jun 16, 2006 1:01 am

Cilla,
I was better from The beginning of February. Only because it took from July until then to get it back under control.

I dread July comming back it seems to be worse then.
but I have a theory that mosuito bites may jump start the procees all over again (The fibers).

PS: The coldest place I think is antartica.
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Postby RANDY » Fri Jun 16, 2006 2:43 am

Goats milk not cows milk. I have heard very good things about raw goats milk. Anyone?
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Postby Skytroll » Fri Jun 16, 2006 5:43 am

Randy,

Depends on where the goat resides.



To all,

some mention of commensals.......

"Scurrying over the body surface of hydra may be seen a number of small animals. These remove bacteria and other debris. These animals are referred to as 'commensals' and do no harm to the hydra. "

I find this hydra quite interesting......

It eats water fleas, can sting and do a number of things and can turn itself inside out.

http://www.microscopy-uk.org.uk/mag/ind ... smal1.html

And....Image finder, microbe viewer.....

http://www.marietta.edu/~spilatrs/biol2 ... Finder.php

Just a diversion for looking at this from the cyano level and beyond.

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Postby RANDY » Fri Jun 16, 2006 5:55 am

Virginia...goat....friend has one
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Postby Barz » Fri Jun 16, 2006 12:11 pm

Dear Cilla,

I am curious why you have not contacted the agencies which you are requesting us to. If in fact we have all been exposed to some man-made entity, you have potentially been exposed, therefore, you need to contact those said agencies. To be honest, I am curious as to why you have such an interest in us. I am very ill. My children have this as well. I have been ridiculed by my own doctors. I will not risk losing my children like many with this have. Nor will I risk being locked up in a psych ward.

I am asking you to please contact those agencies and tell them that you have been exposed to this and follow your own directions. I would greatly appreciate this. I look forward to your response.

Best regards,

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Postby Cilla » Fri Jun 16, 2006 4:05 pm

Hi Barz,

I have not been exposed to anything, and have never even seen a case of Morgellons or the fiber disease, so I am not writing to anyone.

What I am doing is responding to people, like yourself, who say that you are very ill, recount very similar clinical features, some of which have never been seen by human eye until the advent of this apparent disease, (i.e. the callus, see writings of Cliff Mickelson), and many of you then proceed to say that you have sought expert medical help to no apparent avail.

Naturally, I am concerned for you all, who would not be?

What can I say?

Suggest that you go back to the same doctors, with nothing much changed in the way of your clinical complaints, in the hope that eventually they will suddenly realise that:

a. 'That's a callus!',

b. 'This has never been seen before, and has never been documented in the textbooks or journals!',

and so they will logically proceed rapidly to:

c. 'Check for arthropods, helminths, dermatophytes, not forgetting pcr testing for possible cloned cyanobacteria and the dna of the putative protozoal element!'.

I could suggest that you keep going back to the doctor in this way, but not all of you are willing to do so, sometimes because you feel misunderstood, on other occasions because of other reasons.

I could offer words of sympathy and support, (which would not avail anyone of treatment or a cure, but which may arguably be better than nothing. If anyone did not want to read them, they could always fast forward to the next post).

If evidence then emerges that this apparent condition could have arisen from a genetically modified microorganism, and, if it is further suggested by doctors that, absent treatment, it is not going to go away of its own accord, I think it would be quite immoral of me to assauge simply by sympathising.

If one of the persons who raises the spectre of genetically modified microorganisms states that he is a scientist, and advises writing to the ECDC, then of course, if you feel that you are in the category of those suffering absent treatment, the logical step would be to write to them, telling them everything.

In this way, any necessary investigation could be launched by the experts in that organisation.

If anything adverse is uncovered, the necessary information regarding this would be filtered down, via the respective departments of health.

Naturally, the Chief Medical Officers would turn their thoughts to alleviating suffering, obtaining better and better treatments, and obtaining total cure.

This 'top down' approach would filter through to every medical practitioner.

Is that not what you want?

NB, I am not accusing anyone of anything. I do not know if anything got released from any laboratory at any time, and I have always advised that you make no accusations either, of any sort, at any time, by letter or otherwise.

Of course, it may well be that you do not wish to write to the ECDC, or to the corresponding authority in the US.

I could not criticise that decision, for I am not writing to them either, as I have no interest (legally speaking) in what has been suggested. In order to have a legal interest in the matter, one would have to be suffering, apparently from this disease, not be receiving adequate treatment, and perturbed at the point made that a genetically modified microorganism is at the root of it.

So, it seems as though we are stuck (in a sense)here, in that no-one has wished to follow Tam tam's advice to write to the ECDC, so I really do not have a clue about what else to say.

Maybe the answer is to ask Mary at the Morgellons Research Foundation if she has any new information on other doctors who might be able to help.

This could well be the way forward, because, it seems to me, that more and more doctors are taking an interest in Morgellons Disease, Lyme Disease, and the different ways these conditions can present.

I certainly am aware that they are generally becoming more aware of the possible neurological manifestations of Lyme Disease that can occur in some people, and the relevant literature on this is growing.
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Postby Cilla » Fri Jun 16, 2006 6:44 pm

Hi all,

Is Vernon Coleman not interested in possible mistakes with genetic modification?

I am sure that he has a website, and their are nos. for people to call 24 hours.

I think he is a doctor too, as well as being an outspoken and wonderful writer on all sorts.

He does not give clinical advice by remote means, and I think he cannot answer everything directly any more, because of the volume he receives.

But I am sure that he has written on this type of thing.

I think therefore that he might well listen to this.

South, he might be the person that you should contact, because he knows a terrific amount.
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from a friend

Postby RANDY » Fri Jun 16, 2006 11:06 pm

From a friend:

Randy, here is the scoop on quorum sensing.

Copy of The Scientist : How Bacteria Talk

PHOTOS COURTESY OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY


As a young scientist-in-the-making, Bonnie Bassler imagined she would grow up to cure cancer. An undergraduate at the University of California, Davis, Bassler joined the lab of Fredrick Troy, who, in the early 1980s, was conducting two major research projects: one on cancer and one on bacterial carbohydrates. "I thought, surely he'll put me on the important project: the cancer one," recalls Bassler. "Of course he signed me up to work with bacteria. I was furious," she says. "But then I just fell in love with them. During that time I learned that bacteria are like these stripped-down versions of us and that you could actually do amazing science with them. And I've never looked back."


Now, two decades later, Bassler-a professor at Princeton University and a MacArthur Foundation fellow-is credited with discovering the ability bacteria have to communicate across species using a small molecule called autoinducer-2 (AI-2). This simple sugar, produced by scores of microbes including Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Vibrio cholera, and several species of bioluminescent marine bacteria, allows bugs to assess the density of the local prokaryotic population and to adjust their behavior accordingly: throwing off light, spewing out toxins, or forming slimy biofilms. "I am synonymous with the term 'autoinducer-2,' laughs Bassler. "You can boil down 15 years of my life into this one little five-carbon molecule."


The idea that bacteria use chemical signals to convey information about population density-a phenomenon called quorum sensing-has been around for decades. In the early 1970s, microbiologist Woody Hastings noticed that V. fischeri, an organism that resides inside the light organs of squid and other marine life, glows only when its ranks swell. But few scientists appreciated how widespread quorum sensing would turn out to be. "Initially it was thought, well, just a couple of obscure marine organisms are doing this," says Princeton's Ned Win?green, Bassler's colleague and collaborator. Now people realize it's incredibly important; it's central to the life cycle of all these bacteria. Bonnie, more than anyone else, has driven that science from the fringe to the center."



In the Navy
Like her entree into the world of bacterial physiology, the path Bassler followed from the outer reaches to center stage was largely serendipitous. In graduate school at Johns Hopkins in the late 1980s, Bassler took up residence in a lab that had a small grant from the Navy to study how marine bacteria recognize and adhere to sugar molecules, allowing them to form biofilms that coat the underside of boats. Toward the end of her tenure, as she was wondering what she'd do for her postdoc, Bassler attended a small meeting for other Naval grantees. There she met Michael Silverman-the man who unraveled the genetic circuit that V. fischeri use to talk amongst themselves.


"He gave this talk about these cockamamie glow-in-the-dark bacteria that are communicating with each other"-using small molecules to coordinate when, as a community, they should luminesce. "I could hardly understand his talk; there were all these genetic terms I didn't know," she says. "But, I could understand that these bacteria were talking to each other with chemicals, and that all you had to do to figure out what was going on was make mutants that couldn't turn on or off lights. And I thought, 'I can do that. I have no idea what this guy's talking about, but that I can do.'"


So in 1990 Bassler joined Silverman's lab at the Agouron Institute in La Jolla, Calif., where she steeped herself in the world of quorum sensing-and where she stumbled across the interspecies communication system that revolves around AI-2. Bassler set out to repeat Silverman's work in V. harveyi, a free-living microbe that she refers to as the "E. coli of the ocean." These bugs, she thought, might harbor a more sophisticated means of communication than V. fischeri because they live in complex, mixed microbial communities and have to cope with the changing environment of the open sea. Indeed, Bassler soon discovered, V. harveyi possess two parallel systems for keeping track of its neighbors: one that V. harveyi use to talk with other V. harveyi and a second they use to exchange information with other bacterial species-the microbial equivalent of Esperanto.



The problem that solved itself
The work was not as straightforward as Bassler had originally imagined. She had planned to mutate her V. harveyi and look for colonies that no longer glowed. Silverman had used a similar approach in V. fischeri to discover LuxI and LuxR-the enzyme that produces autoinducer-1 and the receptor that recognizes it. But all Bassler's "dark mutants" turned out to have lost their luciferase, the enzyme that actually produces light. "I thought, 'I can't be too dumb to do this,'" she says. Then came an insight that wound up being pivotal. "One day it dawned on me: There had to be two systems. If you knocked out one, the other would still function." That's why Bassler had not found any mutants missing V. harveyi's version of LuxI/LuxR-because she hadn't produced any mutants that were defective in both systems. With that in mind, Bassler was able to isolate mutants in the second system, the interspecies communication network that involves AI-2.


Bonnie Bassler with Karina Xavier in the lab.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY


Figuring out what all those mutant genes do would take another dozen years and a move from La Jolla to Princeton, where Bassler accepted a faculty position in 1994. There, she discovered, among other things, LuxS, the enzyme that synthesizes AI-2. And by 1997, she realized that dozens of different bacteria possess LuxS, which Bassler says indicates that interspecies chit-chat is not an anomaly, but a popular prokaryotic pastime.


However, it wasn't until Bassler and her colleagues had the AI-2 receptor in hand that she was able to isolate and characterize the signal molecule itself. The effort required collaboration with Princeton colleague Fred Hughson, who helped Bassler and her postdoc Stephan Schauder crystallize AI-2 while it was cradled in its receptor. "That's not at all the standard way of finding the structure of a molecule," notes former postdoc Karina Xavier, now at the University of Lisbon in Portugal. "But Bonnie never gave up. She's not afraid of difficult projects. And if she doesn't know the right techniques to approach a problem, she tries to find the right person to help."


Indeed, much of Bassler's success can be credited to her eagerness to enlist individuals from a variety of disciplines to "unlock the secrets of quorum sensing," says Wingreen, a physicist and active member of what he calls the Bonnie Bassler supergroup. "She's like a good general who knows how to marshal her forces and make sure her army works together in a coordinated way."


"Bonnie is willing to listen and willing to learn. She's the only one who more or less understands all of it," adds Princeton chemist and supergroup member Martin Semmelhack. And her infectious enthusiasm draws others in. "She gets very excited about the science. She's bubbly and animated and energetic. She's fun to work with."



What AI-2 switches on
At present, Bassler and her team are working to catalog the suite of genes that V. harveyi switches on in response to AI-2. Postdoc Christopher Waters chopped the bug's genome into random bits and hooked these fragments up to green fluorescent protein (GFP). "We ended up screening about 8,000 colonies that expressed GFP," he says, "and about one percent of those showed response to autoinducer-2." The collection includes genes involved in biofilm formation and central metabolism, as well as regulatory genes and a handful with unknown function.


One gene that E. coli and Salmonella turn on in response to AI-2 encodes a transporter that allows the bugs to take up and degrade the signal molecule-a trick that allows these bacteria to disrupt quorum sensing in other species. In mixed culture experiments, Xavier has found that E. coli can keep V. harveyi from shining and render V. cholera avirulent.


Such results give Bassler hope that she and Semmelhack will be able to design or discover a novel type of broad-spectrum antibiotic-a small molecule that will interrupt quorum sensing, either by blocking the AI-2 receptor or by shutting down its synthesis. Whether they'll succeed remains to be seen. "Still, it'd be nice to have something in my Christmas card saying that I helped people," says Bassler.


Even if she fails to develop such an antibiotic, Richard Losick at Harvard sees Bassler as a "rock star of microbiology." "First, she does first-rate molecular genetics. Second, she's got a wonderful instinct about the biology of microorganisms. And third, she's a gifted speaker and communicates her ideas beautifully," he says. "It took some time for everything to come together for her. But when it did, she rocketed up out of obscurity and came to be recognized as a star in her field."


Thanks in part to that relative obscurity of the work, Bassler didn't receive a National Institutes of Health grant until 2004. "This lab was held together with chewing gum and rubber bands for the first 10 years. But I'm lucky," she says. "A lot of places would have been measuring my office." Officials at Princeton, however, believed in her and in her science-a belief that was rewarded in 2002 when Bassler received a MacArthur genius award. "It's absolutely one of the best things that ever happened to me," she says. "It was a validation of my work and an external validation for everyone in my lab. It's like the world telling them they're doing something special-that they've changed how we think about bacteria."
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Postby RANDY » Fri Jun 16, 2006 11:08 pm

I am asking her opinon of the video and what Tam states. I will wait for her answer.

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Postby ukguy » Fri Jun 16, 2006 11:34 pm

Cilla wrote:Hi Barz,

I have not been exposed to anything, and have never even seen a case of Morgellons or the fiber disease, so I am not writing to anyone.


Cilla

Now that worries me.

Not being affected by this disease yourself, you have advised that people
should read ALL of TamTam's posts. Also suggesting that there may be
many things we have missed in his writings - I agree with that.

You being such a forthright proponent of TamTam's research, it worries
me that you see yourself as being perhaps being bulletproof with regards
to possible infection by this organism. Considering what you are asking
of people - to seriously consider the legitimacy and possible ramifications
of such an organism's existance - I'm surprised that you very much see
yourself as being SAFE on the outside looking in.

TamTam has suggested possible ways this has been spread spread: by
direct contact, water born, air borne etc. I have written several accounts
based on first-hand conversations with people suffering from this
disease that strongly suggest that in certain circumstances (and I do
not know what they are) it is highly contagious. These specific cases
I referred to suggest that this pathogen can infect people with
apparently healthy immune systems - indeed these people could
be considered as being healthy individuals.

So given that you believe TamTam's research (and I am not knocking
this) and I would hope you believe ME, why do you consider yourself
able to commentate on this always from the OUTSIDE?

The advice you give to others does not apply to you?

If so, why?

Barz asked a very important question of you Cilla.


Respectfully
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response

Postby RANDY » Sat Jun 17, 2006 1:49 am

Senator Allen wrote me back: Scuze the typos.

Dear Randy:

I was sorry to learn of the circumstances that prompted your request. In an effort to be of assistance, I have been in touch with the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control. As soon as I have received a response, I will be in touch with you again.

Since your letter also involves isues which fall under the authority of the state government, I have contacted the Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources as well and have asked that they review your concerns and respond to you directly.

Thank you again for taking the time to contact me. It is an honor to serve you in the United States Senate, and I look forward to working with you to make Virginia and America a better place to live, learn, work and raise a family. Please do not hesitate to contact me again if I can be of further assistance to you.

With warm regards, I remain

Sincerely,

George Allen

You bet your life I am following up on this one in a month.

Everyone in Virginia copy his response to me and write him using his response as part of your letter.

Randy
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Postby Linn » Sat Jun 17, 2006 2:02 am

Ukguy

Cilla wrote:
Hi Barz,

I have not been exposed to anything, and have never even seen a case of Morgellons or the fiber disease, so I am not writing to anyone.


Cilla

Now that worries me.

Not being affected by this disease yourself, you have advised that people
should read ALL of TamTam's posts. Also suggesting that there may be
many things we have missed in his writings - I agree with that.



Cilla if you do not have this why are you so interested?
I am just curious, is some one close to you infected or something?
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