Login

Join for Free!
119263 members


The Fiber Disease

Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Medicine. Anything human!

Moderator: BioTeam

Postby Linn » Sat Apr 15, 2006 1:56 am

John has had this for years and currently, his doctor of 12 years
believes that he is creating the lesions himself. He also believes
that...just for the fun of it...he is asking for anti-helminth
prescriptions. After 12 years.


what is anti-helminth?

and how common is that do you think.
people creating the lesions themselves?
Maybe if they are (I happen to think its rare)
they are looking for attention, even if its negative?
reminds me of the "stigmata" so-called phenomenon,
which I think is such a big hoax.
"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these".

~ George washington Carver
User avatar
Linn
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 1735
Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2006 3:53 am
Location: Massachusetts, USA

Postby J Jill » Sat Apr 15, 2006 2:08 am

Hi John,

I appreciate your offer of help- and will take you up on it with other questions I'm sure, but this one was about something that TT posted some time ago.

Step by Step.

I don't know if he wants it spelled out or not- but I believe I found the connection to his clue. Long story.

On another topic, you mentioned in a post a few back about the CDC being open about Lyme disease?

Thing is, there are so few doctors who will test for Lyme much less treat it. Then, there are few reliable tests for the disease. Add to that other variables- such as the length of time that you have had the disease- skewing the results- the fact that antibiotics could alter results- and other factors and you have a small chance of an accurate test result.

My point is that a small fraction of those with Lyme disease are reflected on the CDC chart.

A few years back, I took my daughter and grandson to a doctor who had stated that he specialized in Lyme disease. I asked his office manager/nurse specifically for the Western Blot tests- IgG and IgM for Lyme as a requirement of the visit. No problem she tells me, after speaking to the doctor while I was on the phone.

Didn't work out that way. Instead, somehow the lab ran the Eliza- which is known to be the most inaccurate of all the Lyme disease tests. I requested that the doctor speak to someone at the lab and they re-run the test only this time, the Western Blots. The lab was willing to do it for no additional charge, being that there was some confusion as to which test was to be done.

The doctor refused to make the phone call, even though I had stated prior to the office visit that I wanted a Western Blot/s only.

The doctor's manager/nurse was not shy about taking the $300.00 up front per person for the initial office visit.

My point is- I live in a state where Lyme is not acknowledged. It has to do with the politics of the insurance industry.

My daughter had been bitten by a deer tick, had the bulls-eye rash and many other symptoms. Same for my grandson. Personally, I don't see how this doctor can look in the mirror at himself after taking money for for saying he would do something and flat out not doing it.

That's the short version of the Lyme Specialist story and the reason why the CDC stats are so very wrong.

Someone stated a few years back that the cases of Lyme that are recognized are only about 1/10th of the Lyme cases in this country.

Thinking about the matter exponentially, given that the disease is sexually transmitted, that number could be huge by now.

Certainly, the insurance companies (health industry) would not want to be treating such a huge and growing number of sufferers?

Other than that, it's a great chart.

Jill
Last edited by J Jill on Sat Apr 15, 2006 10:21 am, edited 1 time in total.
"When you dine with the devil, bring a long spoon."
Machiavelli
J Jill
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 113
Joined: Mon Nov 07, 2005 9:58 pm

Postby Linn » Sat Apr 15, 2006 2:20 am

My daughter had been bitten by a deer tick, had the bulls-eye rash and many other symptoms. Same for my grandson. Personally, I don't see how this doctor can look in the mirror at himself much less take my money for saying he would do something and flat out not doing it.


Jill R U saying that they haven't been tested, and/or not treated with anti-biotics?

Londo, this looked interesting, I found it from a Russian link?

http://www.promedmail.org/pls/askus/f?p ... 1000,31226

:I am going to try again to post on lymebusters,
you may see me there but that doesn't mean my
post will go through :(
"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these".

~ George washington Carver
User avatar
Linn
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 1735
Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2006 3:53 am
Location: Massachusetts, USA


Postby John Kern » Sat Apr 15, 2006 3:49 am

Jill,

It's well known that Lyme is underreported by a factor of about 10x, and the CDC aknowledges this. (see: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5317a4.htm). Are you saying that it is more underreported in certain states?

- John
John Kern
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 125
Joined: Tue Apr 11, 2006 7:54 pm

Postby John Kern » Sat Apr 15, 2006 4:17 am

J Jill wrote: A few years back, I took my daughter and grandson to a doctor who had stated that he specialized in Lyme disease. I asked his office manager/nurse specifically for the Western Blot tests- IgG and IgM for Lyme as a requirement of the visit. No problem she tells me, after speaking to the doctor while I was on the phone.


Why go for the western blot test first? Western Blot is usually only indicated after a positive ELISA. Regardless of the order, you'd need to show positive on both tests (and maybe Antigen and PCR) anyway before being diagnosed. One test alone does not really show anything.

- John
John Kern
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 125
Joined: Tue Apr 11, 2006 7:54 pm

Postby London » Sat Apr 15, 2006 5:59 am

Lynne,

That's what I have? So it has a name, eh...."Grisis Signis"

I promise I did not practice scorcery this week.....:) Hey, thanks for the article....was fun to read.
________________________

Sky and UK, That was nice of you to mention what you did. I appreciate it alot. I have not been here in a cople of days but I remember those

last hyperlinks I posted 4 or so pages back were for some reason....
very interesting/important to me.

And Sky and John, thanks for you guys' hyperlinks as well. I went thru and saved each one of them.

Not going to waste too much time here this week going from here to there...
I will tell you that I came across a couple of documents, both important and shocking.over these last two or so evenings. I am not posting them

here yet due to the fact that I need to have another look at them again. It was late night when I found them/ I've been traveling, etc., but boy what a eye opener!

The gest of the documents? Gov't documents stating how to skirt/ lie to the public and the techniques to accomplish this regarding how very bad

that Genetically Modified Foods / transgenic crops are!!!! Even said
that they are recommending to the FDA to test for this and that.....but the ones that are carcenogenic(sp?) don't bother.....

Now was this what the full Document(s) were about??? No! Heck one was 600 pages long (9MB) , but they did say in those documents exactly

what I said above.
_________________________________

Jonh,

I was thinking.....you know I have looked at so very many diseases..../
so many possible parasites/ vectors/ causes.......

I still to this day say the baculovirus is part of this due to insects becoming resistant to the Bt endotoxins,,,,,,

But the GM you keep asking me/ maybe others about> and why we think that????

Well, I have no proof that there was some mad scientist(although

there prob. is) out there that created this thing by GM stuff.... no I don't know that so I can't say that - but what i can say is GM thru food/gene modification./translocation......The GM stuff is horrible!!! The maize-the worst.

They are also feeding our poultry and our swine V. bad stuff......thus> you know the ecological cycle here,......

John My doc is about to test me for the PHIlipelphia Chromosone.....

since I have begged and pleaded with him...(It's where it takes from chromo22 and places it on 9) anyway this is due to the arthritic problems that are now suddenly in my ankles and the severe swelling

that stays constant here.......Now this swelling started the weekend after I came down with this Morg thing last Aug.

Bottom line (sorry to have gotten off point) is that there is too many other weirdo- sci-fi like things happening in /on our bodies and in our homes....(how would you like it/ or what would you think John if you suddenly

woke up one morning to find these bright red starfish/octopus looking creatures scattered thru-out your house on top of the beige carpet? Or suddenly like magic these ameoba looking 3-4 inch globs and some shaped like parasites.....strewn across you bath mirror????

TRIPPY! Can't be real. It's got to be ?????what you tell me......

This is no one Sub-Saharen parasite like oncho or Bancrofti......

it is just too strange to be that.......I swear the above happened to me John and I do have the photos to back this up. I guess I'm just realizing to stop looking at each parasitic disease, etc., and think this has to be it.

Even if it were a proven fact that everyone of us Morg sufferers had a 3 foot long tape worm living in us, I'd still have to say with 100% conviction that there is something a helluva lot bigger than this worm thing

going on. So, If you were a sufferer John and this strange concoction
of sci-fi like occurances transpired right before you and your loved ones eyes (and you maybe watched this strange goop/ gel form across your lil

kiddos' forehead when he got out of the tub each night.)......

Well what would you do? what would you think? What should we do??

We are at a loss!!!!! Never in my wildest dreams would i have thought anything like this on earth would be possible in my lifetime-never!!!


Please give out your true feelings if you see and choose to respond to this.

It is so sad John. Most of us have family members that are not infected that do not believe us. This is what hurts the most to me.

I am an only child and lost my Dad to Cancer 3 years ago and when this disease struck my fiance' and I. I was scared and I called my Mother and pleaded with her to rush to my home (5 hour drive) saying it was most urgent. She shows up, sees the crap in my house (cocoon and all) and chooses not to console /ponder/ investigate but to instead

ridicule>Said I should " get a grip on reality"....( it was not in her old medical book she once was a student of, thus she did not believe it), you get my drift.)....She still to this day thinks the heinous marks and blisters on my left forearm were cuased from me hurting myself....

Like with a knife.....Jeez, Please.....wake me up!!!!

************
this is how sad the whole scenario/reality

we, as Morg victims live in......
London
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 1277
Joined: Thu Nov 17, 2005 3:41 am

Shame on you

Postby Sabrina » Sat Apr 15, 2006 6:44 am

Pimozide: Use in Dermatology
Willem A.van Vloten, MD, PhD1
Dermatology Online Journal 9 (2): 3
1. Department of Dermatology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Post Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht, the Netherlands. w.a.vanvloten@wxs.nl
________________________________________

Abstract
Pimozide is widely used in psychiatry for chronic psychoses, schizophrenia, the syndrome of Gilles de la Tourette and to a certain extent, also in dermatology. The only dermatological indication is for delusions of parasitosis. Though there is a good rationale for using pimozide in this disease, the majority of the studies on pimozide in dermatology are uncontrolled trials and case reports.
________________________________________

Introduction
Pimozide is a neuroleptic and a selective blocker of dopamine D2 receptors.[1] In 1975 it was used for the first time in patients with monosymptomatic hypochondriacal psychoses (MHP's). In all five patients treated, there was disappearance or marked improvement of the symptoms.[2] Monosymptomatic hypochondriacal psychoses are defined as disorders in which a single delusion is present without other thought disorders and the delusions are not secondary to other psychiatric diseases.[3] Patients with MHP's generally appear normal in behavior. Since patients with delusions of parasitosis believe that the disease is a dermatological disease and not a psychiatric disorder they seek dermatological help.[4] "Folie a deux" is the term which describes the situation when the delusion is shared by another person, usually the spouse.

Chemistry
The chemical formula of pimozide is (C28 H 29 F2 N3O) is: 1- [1- [4,4- Bis(4- fluorphenyl) butyl] -4- piperidinyl] -1, 3- dihydro-2 H- benzimidazol -2-one. The molecular weight is 461.56

Pharmacology and toxicology
Pimozide is a highly selective blocker of dopamine D2 receptors in the limbic system, the corpus striatum and the pituitary. It also blocks the alpha-1-adrenoceptors and serotoninergic receptors, although to a lesser extent. The oral bioavailability of pimozide is about 50%. After oral administration the peak plasma concentration is reached in 6-8 hours. The plasma half-life of pimozide after a single oral dose is reported with a wide range of 29 - 150 hours. After ingestion pimozide is widely distributed in the body, but with increased concentrations in the liver. It is metabolized in the liver and the metabolites are excreted primarily in the urine and to lesser extent in the feces.
There is no direct correlation between the plasma concentration of pimozide and the clinical effect. In patients receiving 6 mg per day the plasma concentration may vary as much as 17 fold.[7] Therefore, the dosage to be given should be adapted individually. Generally, the effective dose range is from 2.8 to 11.4 mg/day. The action of pimozide lasts 24 - 48 hours, which allows it to be administered as a single daily dose in common practice.
As with other neuroleptic drugs pimozide in higher dosage may lead to a prolonged QT interval on the ECG. In the used dosage pimozide does not lead to sedation. Postural hypotension may result from blockage of the alpha-1-adrenoceptors. [5,6] Signs of acute toxicity include tremor, sedation and convulsions. Oral LD50 range from 10 g.kg-1 in guinea pigs to 40 mg.kg-1 in dogs. Chronic toxicity has not been reported.

Use in dermatology
Patients with delusions of parasitosis usually visit a dermatologist rather than a psychiatrist for the reason that they have a firm belief that they suffer from a dermatological disease, such as an infestation, and not a psychiatric disorder. For that reason most of the reports on delusions of parasitosis are published in dermatoloical journals. The diagnosis is often easy to make. Typical patients have a tendency to ramble in their descriptions. They generally disagree with or completely disregard even the slightest consideration of an alternative diagnosis. They relate histories of numerous previous evaluations and useless treatments. The so-called "proof" is the moment that the patient shows a matchbox in which he or she has gathered the "parasites." In fact, the contents of such a box are hairs, scales of skin, bits of wool, and crusts.
Prior to the use of pimozide the remission rate in this delusional disorder was about 30% as shown in a meta-analysis of 1223 case reports.[8] However, when pimozide was used for the first time in a double blind study of patients with delusions of parasitosis, after 6 weeks of pimozide medication, 10 out of 11 patients had improved markedly.[9] In addition, a 34 month follow-up study of 14 patients who were treated with pimozide 19 to 44 months earlier, revealed that 50% of these patients no longer suffered from delusions of parasitosis.[10] Zomer et al. studied 33 patients with delusions of parasitosis treated with pimozide. Of 18 patients treated with pimozide 11 obtained a remission. Of the 15 patients not treated with pimozide, only 3 showed a remission.[4]. Due to dramatic results such as these, pimozide is considered the drug of choice for the treatment of delusions of parasitosis.[11,12,13]
The lowest effective dosage of pimozide should be used to minimize side effects. The dosage used in delusions of parasitosis is 1-5 mg/d for about 6 weeks. Improvement is usually noticed after 3-4 weeks of medication.
The antipsychotic drug, risperidone, has also been shown to be effective in the treatment of delusions of parasitosis. Its much safer adverse effect profile compared to pimozide would make it a good alternative. However no large studies are available at present using risperidone in delusions of parasitosis.[14]

Psychiatric indications
• Acute and chronic schizophrenia,
• Syndrome of Gilles de la Tourette,
• Mania and hypomania
• Monosymptomatic hypochondrical psychoses,
• Trigeminal neuralgia.
In acute psychoses the therapeutic dosage is 5-50 mg daily with a mean dose of 20 mg.[15] However due to reports of serious side effects a maximum daily dosage of 20 mg is now recommended. In the UK, the Committee of Safety for Medicines (CSM) recommends an ECG prior to treatment and follow-up ECG's periodically when dosages over 16 mg daily are used. In chronic psychotic conditions the effective dosage is 2-20 mg daily.

Contraindications
• Hypersensitivity to pimozide
• Cardiac arrythmic disorders and ECG abnormalities
• Congenital prolonged QT interval
• Severe CNS depression
• Parkinson's disease (relatively contra-indicated)
• Endogenous depression (relatively contra-indicated)
• Age under 12 years

Pregnancy and lactation
Although no adverse effects have been reported in pregnancy, safety has not been demonstrated. Therefore, pimozide should be avoided in pregnant women. Pimozide is excreted in breast milk at the same or higher concentration of that in the plasma.

Interactions
Drugs which depress the central nervous system can be potentiated by pimozide. These drugs include alcohol, barbiturates, anesthetics, antihistamines and benzodiazepines. The use of pimozide together with any of these should be minimized.
QT wave lengthening will be greater in those patients already taking other medications that lenthen the QT interval, such as certain antiarrhythmics, other neuroleptics (eg. thioridazine), and antidepressants. The result of prolonged QT interval can be Q or T phenomenon or torsades de pointes (a polymorphic ventricular arrhythmia), both of which can degenerate into a fatal ventricular arrhythmia.[16]

Other potential adverse reactions
Pimozide may produce a number of other potential problems. It can cause a Parkinson's-like syndrome within the first few days. Tardive dyskinesia, like that seen with other neuroleptics, can occur with prolonged use.[12] Other dystonic manifestations can occur, the most common of which is torticollis. Tight binding to the dopamine D2 receptor appears to be the cause of these disturbing side effects.[17] Acute oculogyric crisis is a very frightening side effect that one should be familiar with if using this class of medications. Minor problems can be managed with concomitant benztropine, and acutely with with diphenhydramine, but oculogyric crisis is best managed by a psychiatrist.
Because of their effects on prolactin secretion, neuroleptics can precipitate amenorrhea, galactorrhea, and dysmenorrhea.[17]

Conclusion
Pimozide, a selective blocker of dopamine receptors, remains the drug of choice for treatment of delusions of parasitosis, though large, controlled studies are lacking. Smaller studies however, do show a significant, and often prolonged, benefit. However, though pimozide, with more published studies to attest to its efficacy, is currently the treatment of choice for patients with delusions of parasitosis, the much safer, atypical antipsychotics such as risperidone, may soon become more frequently used for this condition.
References
1. Carvey P. Drug action in the nervous system. New York, Oxford University Press, 1998

2. Riding BE, Munro A. Pimozide in monosymptomatic psychosis. Lancet 1975;1:400-401

3. Munro A. Monosymptomatic hypochondrical psychosis. Br J Hosp Med 1980;24:34-38

4. Zomer SF, de Wit RFE, van Bronswijk JE, Nabarro G, van Vloten WA. Delusions of parasitosis. A psychiatric disorder to be treated by dermatologists? An analysis of 32 patients. Br J Dermatol 1998;138:1030-1032

5. Dolery C ed. Therapeutic drugs. Churchill Livingstone 1999

6. Wielink PS van, Leysen JE. Choice of neuroleptic on the basis of in-vitro pharmacology. J Drug Res 1983;8:1984-1997

7. McCreadier RG, Heykants JJP, Chalmers A, Anderson AM. Plasma pimozide profilesin chronic schizophrenics. Br J Clin Pharmacol 1979;7:534-535

8. Trabert W. 100 years of delusion of parasitosis: meta-analysis of 1223 case reports. Psychopathology 1995;28:238-246

9. Hamann K, Avnstorp C, Delusions of infection treated by pimozide : a double-blind crossover clinical study. Acta Derm Venereol (Stockh) 1982;62:55-58

10. Lindskov R, Baadsgaard O. Delusions of infestation treated with pimozide: a follow up study. Acta Derm Venereol (Stockh) 1985;65:267-270

11. Driscoll MS, Rothe MJ, Grant-Kels JM, Hale MS. Delusions of parasitosis: a dermatologic, psychiatric and pharmacologic approach. J Am Acad Dermatol 1993;29:1023-1033

12. Koo J, Lee CS. Delusions of parasitosis. A dermatologist's guide to diagnosis and treatment. Am.J.Clin Dermatol 2001;2:285-290

13. Tennyson H, Levine N. Neurotropic and psychotropic drugs in dermatology. Sys Dermatol Ther 2001;19:179-197

14. Elmer KB, George RM, Peterson K. Therapeutic update:use of risperidone for the treatment of monosymptomatic hypochondriacal psychosis. J Am Acad Dermatol 2000;43:683-686

15. Silverstone T, Cookson J, Ball R et al.. The relationship of dopamine receptor blockade to clinical response in schizophrenic patients treated with pimozide or haloperidol. J Psychiatr Res 1984;18:255-268

16. Haddad PM, Andrews IM. Antipsychotic related QTc prolongation, torsades de pointes and sudden death. Drugs 2002;62:1649-1671.

17. Seeman P. Atypical antipsychotics: mechanisms of action. Can J Psychiatry 2002;47(1):27-38.
© 2003 Dermatology Online Journal
http://dermatology.cdlib.org/92/reviews ... loten.html



Dear John,

My psychiatrist only prescribes paxil for my depression. He does not think I am having delusions and would never prescribe a drug for a condition I did not have. He has supported me through all of this all the way to the Health Department. He was the first doctor to run any tests on me and found that I was anemic. This psychiatrist encouraged me to get tested for Lyme since I had served in the military and stationed in New London Ct. You know where that is John? Old Lyme County sound familiar to ya? Yep, the epicenter! He is brilliant because sure enough the Lyme was detected and so was babesiosis. Babesiosis is a parasite John. Granted it is in the red blood cells and cannot account for the fiber symptoms, but a parasite none the less John. So, delusion that ok?

Now tell me why my general practitioners or dermatologists never ever tested me for anything but AIDS prior to this?????


The Health Department did not think I was having delusions either. I performed and they collected the crap.

So to answer your question as to if anyone ever experimented with this drug, the answer is no, in my case. Our doctors don’t prescribe those either. :shock: :wink: :shock:

Peace,
Sabrina

P.S.
Don’t you know Lyme is a clinical diagnosis? Tests are nothing but a diagnostic tool, nothing more and not even accurate!

What is a recognized means of diagnosing Lyme Disease?

A search of the TRIP Database located a number of guidelines and eTextbook articles that discuss diagnosis. A recent American guideline reports on the diagnosis of Lyme Disease

[1]. It has a section “Diagnostic Concerns” which discusses various aspects of diagnosis. This is summarized in the key recommendations as:

“Since there is currently no definitive test for Lyme disease, laboratory results should not be used to exclude an individual from treatment.
Lyme disease is a clinical diagnosis and tests should be used to support rather than supersede the physician’s judgment.”

However, the guideline discusses many other aspects and we recommend you read these at http://www.guidelines.gov/summary/summa ... oc_id=4836

Snip

Finally, GP Notebook, has a section on the diagnosis of Lyme Disease [3] which states:

“It is worth assessing the risks by considering the pathogenesis and clinical features of Lyme disease - negative serology does not exclude the diagnosis.

http://www.lymediseaseaction.org.uk/diagnose.htm
Happy reading John.
User avatar
Sabrina
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 268
Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2005 8:03 pm

Waisted time

Postby Sabrina » Sat Apr 15, 2006 6:51 am

John Kern wrote:Had anyone had any experience with pimozide?
User avatar
Sabrina
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 268
Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2005 8:03 pm

Postby London » Sat Apr 15, 2006 1:06 pm

pimozide? Why this is for Touretts Syndrom and is also Carcinogenic.

Why do you ask this John?
________________

JJill,

is this what you were asking about?
http://www.radiochemistry.org/2005_slovenia/index.html
_____________

Synthetic Life Research Shows Progress—And Raises Questions

http://www.aaas.org/news/releases/2005/ ... life.shtml
London
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 1277
Joined: Thu Nov 17, 2005 3:41 am

Postby London » Sat Apr 15, 2006 1:17 pm

"Our current knowledge does not provide us with the means to predict the ecological long-term effects of releasing organisms into the environment. So it is beyond the competence of the scientific system to answer such a question..."

http://www.psrast.org/ctenvir.htm
London
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 1277
Joined: Thu Nov 17, 2005 3:41 am

Postby Linn » Sat Apr 15, 2006 1:43 pm

London, wow you never spilled your guts
quite like that before.
I am so sorry for your suffering.

John,
RU and entomologist?

Tam,
R U saying this is what happened????
RE: "Your Target?";

Getting new DNA into a human safely and effectively just isn’t yet a reality. DNA tends to get put into our cells randomly right now. What that means is that the new gene could land anywhere in our DNA.

If it lands in the wrong place, things can go wrong pretty quickly. One of the most common problems is that the body shuts the gene off. The body does this to foreign genes because it treats them like an invader.

"Many viruses, like HIV, stick themselves into our DNA. Once this happens, they turn on their genes and crank out harmful proteins. It is usually in the body’s best interest to shut off these sorts of genes.

Sometimes even worse things can happen. In one gene therapy experiment in France, the gene landed in the wrong spot and caused leukemia. How did it do this?

The virus carrying the gene landed near an oncogene. An oncogene is a gene that can cause cancer. By landing next to this oncogene, the virus turned it on and the kids got cancer."

-Dr. Barry Star (Stamford University)
Last edited by Linn on Sat Apr 15, 2006 2:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these".

~ George washington Carver
User avatar
Linn
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 1735
Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2006 3:53 am
Location: Massachusetts, USA

Postby John Kern » Sat Apr 15, 2006 2:34 pm

London wrote:pimozide? Why this is for Touretts Syndrom and is also Carcinogenic.

Why do you ask this John?


I was asking because it's often pescribed for DOP - and since many people here say that their doctors tend to diagnose them as DOP, then I though that they might have been pescribed it at some point. I was wondering if it had any effect at all?

- John
John Kern
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 125
Joined: Tue Apr 11, 2006 7:54 pm

PreviousNext

Return to Human Biology

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests