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Genetic Engineering possible with estrogen?

Genetics as it applies to evolution, molecular biology, and medical aspects.

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Genetic Engineering possible with estrogen?

Postby Tenshi » Tue Apr 04, 2006 2:55 am

I have a question about estrogen. Now we know that the bacteria E. Coli can be genetically engineered to contain the gene that codes for insulin so my question is.

Can bacteria be used to create estrogen, or why can it not be done?

I appreciate the help. I have been looking for answers since Saturday night.
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Postby bbs_r » Tue Apr 04, 2006 7:43 am

I think "Yes", because as long as you insert the correct sequence into the little thing. The thing will make protein for you, isn't it?

Or I am too noob to answer this question?

I don't know....:)
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Postby Nithin » Tue Apr 04, 2006 2:26 pm

E.Coli can be genetically engineered to accomodate genes of insulin because of compatibility. If there is any organism which accepts the genes of oestrogen without any hitch then it is possible.
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Postby canalon » Tue Apr 04, 2006 3:40 pm

The problem is that insulin is peptide. Youbasically just need to put the gene and here you are with your insulin (except that you may want to have secreted, but this is just to simplify your culture).
Estrogen is not a polypetide, so what you need is to insert a whole pathway in the bacteria to get from the closest precursor you can naturally find in the bacteria (or cheaply feed them) to the finished product. This is probably possible but a lot of fine tuning at all level maybe necessary to get the correct chemicals without killing your bacteria. So it maybe cheaper not to use recombinant bacteria.
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Postby Tenshi » Tue Apr 04, 2006 6:24 pm

Canalon wrote:The problem is that insulin is peptide. Youbasically just need to put the gene and here you are with your insulin (except that you may want to have secreted, but this is just to simplify your culture).
Estrogen is not a polypetide, so what you need is to insert a whole pathway in the bacteria to get from the closest precursor you can naturally find in the bacteria (or cheaply feed them) to the finished product. This is probably possible but a lot of fine tuning at all level maybe necessary to get the correct chemicals without killing your bacteria. So it maybe cheaper not to use recombinant bacteria.


Awesome, thanks you have been a huge help. You have relieved me of a lot of stress!
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Postby MrMistery » Fri Apr 07, 2006 7:04 pm

Not tu burst your bubble, but estrogen is made from cholesterol, and E.coli can not create cholesterol. In eukaryotes, cholesterol is made in the smooth endoplasmic reticulum, so in bacteria it might be a problem to make it.
Plus bacteria generally do not steroids except for genus Opanois.
So i really think you need to consider some other method.

PS: Want estrogen? Buy contraceptive pills ;)
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Postby Tenshi » Mon Apr 10, 2006 11:08 pm

So you are saying this for ALL bacteria, or just E.coli? @MrMistery
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