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need identification of insect/parasite

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Postby Dr.Stein » Wed Feb 01, 2006 12:59 pm

All I have is Borror et al (A Field Guide to Insects). The classic one. It is good enough IMO :)
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Postby Linn » Thu Feb 02, 2006 5:49 am

never mind not a trematoda :shock:
Last edited by Linn on Tue Mar 07, 2006 6:57 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Dr.Stein » Thu Feb 02, 2006 8:21 am

Trematodes? :shock: Naah, I-I-I don't like worms :roll: sorry :oops:
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Postby Linn » Mon Feb 13, 2006 8:09 pm

:lol: :lol: :lol:
I just wanted to show the shape of it.
it is similar in shape to that.
Any thing else similar, black or dark brown, apple seed shape body, tapered at both ends.
Sorry did not get to see it with a scope :cry:

just suuggestions on any thing any one knows about things shaped like that. Provide a link if you think of anything. I really could use help researching this. I have looked at a lOT of pics already.
trmatode is closest. but I dont think that is it.
this is much smaller.
thanx

:? :? :?
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Postby Linn » Tue Mar 07, 2006 5:57 am

I just wanted to say thanx to everyone who
tried to find the answer and wanted to update
you that I finally found the answer
after long long hours of searching.
You would be surprised to find how
hard it is to find pictures of all the
insects stages even at the CDC!!

I am so happy :D

So at long last,I do believe this is it:

http://www.cdfound.to.it/html/ecto_col.htm#coll9

Lynne
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Postby Doc44 » Sat Mar 11, 2006 4:56 pm

Sorry Lynne, but you have gotten some wrong information at that site. Collembola do not have a larval or pupa stage in their life cycle. They have an egg, nymph, and adult stage. You can't believe everything you read on the web even about Collembola.

Nymph
There is no metamorphic cycle of egg-larva-pupa-adult. On hatching from the eggs, nymphs resemble miniature adults. The immature springtail nymphs pass through several moults of the exoskeleton until they reach adult size and maturity


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Postby damien james » Sun Mar 12, 2006 12:23 am

If collembola and leech like it could be this?

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They are called podomorpha. Here is link.

http://www.missouri.edu/~bioscish/podomorpha.html

It does not say they are parasite though. Are they bite you? If they are then not collembola, but something else I think.
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Postby Linn » Mon Mar 13, 2006 8:58 pm

Doc44 wrote:Sorry Lynne, but you have gotten some wrong information at that site. Collembola do not have a larval or pupa stage in their life cycle. They have an egg, nymph, and adult stage. You can't believe everything you read on the web even about Collembola.

Nymph
There is no metamorphic cycle of egg-larva-pupa-adult. On hatching from the eggs, nymphs resemble miniature adults. The immature springtail nymphs pass through several moults of the exoskeleton until they reach adult size and maturity


Doc44


Oh no dont tell me that :shock:
well what is it a picture of then?
because that is the shape of it exactly,
exept it was darker dark brown/black.
if its not a collembolla I need to know the name.
I am glad to just see a picture at least of same
shape thing I saw. Thank you for your info :)

Thanx for the link Damien,
I have looked at hundreds of collembolla pictures
and up until the link I provided I didnt think they
had a larvae stage either. Now that is confirmed.
it cant be one so now what? Back to the drawing board!! :cry:
Lynne
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Postby damien james » Tue Mar 14, 2006 3:44 am

I should not have said can't. Sorry Linn, I should know by then that anything is possible in science. I had just read that they are not parasitic, but anything can change, right? Even if not collembola known, it could be unknown species or something like that. Best of luck Linn.
The hand of God may well be all around us, but it is not, nor can it be, the task of science to dust for fingerprints.
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Collembola

Postby Cherry » Mon Jul 31, 2006 8:35 pm

Linn, there is a very large community of individuals around the world suffering with Collembola infestation, myself included. A search of the internet for "Collembola in Humans" provides much information and photos to compare to. Bear in mind that, since these "bugs" are barely visible, picking or scraping them off of oneself or an animal will cause parts of the bugs, i.e. feelers, legs, etc. to be destroyed. Once entry into the skin has occurred, they reproduce freely under the skin and ultimately morph to smaller versions that still have feelers, heads, segments legs and the "springtail." Thus the controversy over what they really are since whole specimens are hard to get and physicians these days say "Prove it to me."
I hope you and your dog only have some kind of mite.
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Postby Linn » Mon Jul 31, 2006 11:46 pm

Thanxs cherry.
but I have ruled out springtail since was brought out they do not have larva stage.
No it definetly is some kind of tremetoda or possible nemetode -looking thing. I have not had any problems this year, but worry that other people may come across this unusual insect. The link I gave incorrectly identified it as a collembolla, but the insect I saw it looked just like that picture of the larvae stage of ....something..

:?

Oh and it definetly migrates under the skin and emerges when fully grown.
I noticed my neighbors dog seems to have something wrong with his skin and the hair is falling out. suggesting this is in the enviroment around here.
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Your neighbor's dog

Postby Cherry » Tue Aug 01, 2006 1:14 pm

Sounds like mange in your neighbor's dog. Not a good thing to be around as your dog could get it. Also called Demodex, it lives under the skin and eats the hair follicles thus the hair falls out. There ARE documented cases of humans getting it, though rare.
Vets usually recommend pyrethrin shampoos for maintenance and a high protein diet to boost the dog's immune system. (I know this because I went through it with my dog.)

P.S., some Collembola look like larvae, and so does Demodex.

Best of luck.
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