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Matching blood groups

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Matching blood groups

Postby zenith_beth » Mon Nov 07, 2005 8:04 pm

Why is it that when it comes to matching blood groups (for transfusion purposes) the agglutinin of the donor isn't taken into consideration? Because theoretically blood group A, for example, with its agglutinin b, can cause clumping in a person with blood group B. Why does this not happen :?:
wizzie :-)
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Postby MrMistery » Mon Nov 07, 2005 8:10 pm

I hate to break this to you but it does...
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter
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Postby Poison » Wed Nov 09, 2005 5:17 pm

not taken into consideration? really?
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How charged with punishment the scroll
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Postby zenith_beth » Thu Nov 10, 2005 2:59 pm

Yes!! REALLY :-P. My tutor told us that it doesn't effect matching. So if clumping happens as Mistery said, perhaps it happens to such a small extent that it doesn't really matter in the end!.. or is it that the donor's aggluntinins are removed by some process?????... I can't seem to get to the bottom of this and it's really annoying!!! :(
wizzie :-)
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Postby sdekivit » Thu Nov 10, 2005 5:43 pm

if i have blood group A and i get blood group B i would be very concerned about how long i have to live :oops:
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Postby biostudent84 » Thu Nov 10, 2005 5:52 pm

zenith_beth wrote:Yes!! REALLY :-P. My tutor told us that it doesn't effect matching. So if clumping happens as Mistery said, perhaps it happens to such a small extent that it doesn't really matter in the end!.. or is it that the donor's aggluntinins are removed by some process?????... I can't seem to get to the bottom of this and it's really annoying!!! :(


It is kind of bold to say this, but your tutor is wrong...
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Postby zenith_beth » Thu Nov 10, 2005 6:12 pm

Perhaps, I'm not making myself clear. A donor blood grp O has agglutinins a and b, right? Now this can be transfused into a person wih blood group A which has agglutinogen A... don't agglutinin 'a' and agutinogen 'A' clump!!!!
wizzie :-)
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Postby biostudent84 » Thu Nov 10, 2005 6:24 pm

zenith_beth wrote:Perhaps, I'm not making myself clear. A donor blood grp O has agglutinins a and b, right? Now this can be transfused into a person wih blood group A which has agglutinogen A... don't agglutinin 'a' and agutinogen 'A' clump!!!!


No. Type O has neither protein marker. Type AB blood has both A and B markers. You can transfer blood with no markers to blood with markers, but not the other way around.

A can donate to A
B can donate to B
AB can donate to AB
O can donate to all A, B, AB, and O

A can recieve from A and O
B can recieve from B and O
AB can recieve from A, B, AB, and O
O can recieve from O
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Postby sdekivit » Thu Nov 10, 2005 7:19 pm

you can remember: A has agglutinogen A and there doesn't produce agglutinine A but produces agglutinine B

B has agglutinogen B and therefore produces agglutinine A

AB produces no agglutinine and O both

therefore O can only receive O because otherewise a agglutinoge/agglutnine-complex can be formed resulting in bloodclotting.

Another example:

A has agglutinine B and therefore cannot receive B/AB but can receive A and O.

You never want to form a agglutinogen/agglutinine-complex to be formed --> this will always result in bloodclotting.
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Postby zenith_beth » Fri Nov 11, 2005 9:30 am

I'm aware of how blood groups are matched but what I can't understand is WHY blood group O may donate to blood group A when blood group O contains agglutinin a!!!! I was wondering if the agglutinins were removed by some process before being transfused into another person!
wizzie :-)
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Postby biostudent84 » Fri Nov 11, 2005 12:37 pm

It is the presence of conflicting agglutinins that cause the clotting, therefore making transfusion impossible. The red blood cells in type O individuals have no agglutinins in the first place, therefore do not cause potential for clotting.
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Postby zenith_beth » Fri Nov 11, 2005 4:18 pm

Blood type O has no agglutinogens, BUT it HAS agglutinins a and b!!! Blood type A has agglutinogen A and agglutinin b. In the scenario of O giving to A why don't the agglutinin a (from blood O) and aglutinogen A (from blood type A) agglutinate or rather cause problems?!?!?!? Incidentally it's blood group AB which has no agglutinins!!!!
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