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it's by Mycotine or Virus?

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it's by Mycotine or Virus?

Postby victor » Sat Oct 01, 2005 12:16 pm

I'm doin a search about the plant in front of my room and I can report this:
- I saw the plant is 'sick' by having chlorocys on all the leaves.
- I take the 'sick' leaf, mix it with water and pour it to the helthy plant.
- the next day (less than 24 hours), the healthy plant have a few white spots on some of it's leaves.
- I wait till 2 weeks and I found that the plant is becoming like the 'sick' plant.

the syndromes like this:
-chlorocys (light)
-the growth is inhibited
-chlorocys (heavy)
-for the small plant (height <8 cm), it will die in less than 2 weeks but for big plant (height >30 cm), it needs more than 2 weeks to die (still haven't measured)

I think that this kind of mycotine/virus are attracted at the high energy places (chloroplasts) because I can't find any odd with it's branch..

can someone give opinion bout this?
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Postby MrMistery » Sat Oct 01, 2005 6:09 pm

The cause why the desease only affects the green parts of the plant is one out of probable 1000. If it is a virus, it could binf to a receptor on the membrane of the chloroplast(however unlikely if ou ask me). Also remember that the leaf is the part with most glucose to be found so if it is a living organism it might go there because there is plenty of food.
By the way, are you sure the branches aren't affected internally? Try to cut one, any anomalies should be easy to spot...
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Postby victor » Tue Oct 04, 2005 11:31 am

whadaya mean "unlikely if you ask me"?
I've read in the general virology book-plant virology and it said that plant viruses also tend to get arount in the chloroplasts because of the high energy-electron reaction inside it....
I've cut a little bit from the branch and no anomalies can be spotted there..(with my naked eyes)
My professor said that I shoul bring the sample to the plant pathology professor...but, she's hard to find... :)
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Postby MrMistery » Tue Oct 04, 2005 5:40 pm

Well, you know more immunology and virology and pathology and stuff like that than me, so your guess is better than mine...
Find the professor, that's the best thing to do
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Postby victor » Fri Oct 07, 2005 12:52 pm

Ow...thanks.. :D but, how can you say that??
After I ask the professor, I'll make sure it's published here in this forum....huahahaha... :lol:
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Postby victor » Mon Oct 17, 2005 12:26 pm

I can say that it's an infection done by virus...and the next thing I found is...the plants have their own immune system.
I see that in the lower part of the branch, the leaves suffers chlorocys but not with th upper one..the upper one just get curlied but no chlorocys were spotted.
After reading and reading I found that plants use substances named Phytoalexin and PR (Pathogenic-Related) protein to supress the virus and depositioning the lignin.

@Andrew
Still remember plant hormone named Brassinolide that I asked a couple months ago? I also found it, Brassinolide are grouped into Brassinosteroid and required in order to grow normally.
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Postby victor » Mon Oct 17, 2005 1:02 pm

More addition about Brassinosteroid:
it's a newly invented plant hormone synthesized from Acetyl-CaA and undergo Mevalonic acid pathway. We [animal kingdom] also undergo this pathway but not resulting Brassinolide. We produce Cholesterol.
So: Plants = Brassinolide
Animals = Cholesterol
For the plant lovers, I hope this helps... :lol: :D
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Postby MrMistery » Mon Oct 17, 2005 5:37 pm

Don't plants produce fitosterol at the end of the same methabolic pathway that we produce cholesterol? -guess
This i know for sure: The cell membrane at animals contains cholesterol, at plants in contains a similar sompound called fitosterol.
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Postby victor » Wed Oct 19, 2005 11:36 am

Yup, you're right....remember you chemistry lesson..
cholesterol (suffix -sterol) means contains a steroid ring. The same thing happens to Brassinolide which is known as a hormone, Branosteroid, have a steroid ring. That's why Brassinosteroid also grouped as phytosterol.
For the structure of Brassinosteroid, please look at this:
http://www.chem-is-try.org/index.php?sect=artikel&ext=82
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Postby MrMistery » Wed Oct 19, 2005 5:13 pm

Although i am one of the best in my class at chemistry, i must admit that i have a long way to go with organic since i just started it. But i like it and i am eager to learn. By the way the site does not work
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Postby victor » Fri Oct 21, 2005 11:58 am

Organic chemistry is easier to learn than inorganic one I think...I'm also majoring organic chemistry here.. :D
WHAT?!? it doesn't work?? ow, since I don't know how to post images here, I'll give you the steps:.. :oops:
Go to here: http://www.chem-is-try.org
then see 'artikel terbaru' at the front page, select 'arsip artikel' (article archive) and choose 'Brassinolide....', there's the structure of brassinosteroid.
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Postby MrMistery » Fri Oct 21, 2005 5:17 pm

I can't find it. Anyway, it's not important. I'll ask you if i ever need it. By the way, i was reading sth about plant anatomy yesterday and saw a phrase that went as follows: "All parazites, viri and bacteria tend to migrate to the most energy-filled regions of the plant." And i thought about this post :D
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