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Enzymes

Discussion of all aspects of biological molecules, biochemical processes and laboratory procedures in the field.

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Postby rk386 » Wed Aug 15, 2012 7:03 pm

Thanks. It is pretty amazing what technology can do. So by this method, the rate at which a protein breaks down can be determined, e.g. an enzyme?
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Re: Enzymes

Postby jonmoulton » Wed Aug 15, 2012 9:21 pm

Yes.
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Postby KileYe » Fri Aug 17, 2012 12:11 pm

They will degrade through metabolism
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Postby rk386 » Mon Aug 20, 2012 3:19 pm

What controls that metabolism?
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Postby rk386 » Mon Aug 20, 2012 3:36 pm

Also, in terms of the rate at which an enzyme acts, other than substrate concentration and reaction rate, are there any other conditions that would regulate the rate at which an enzyme works? Are there such thing as inherently "slower" or "faster" enzymes?
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Re: Enzymes

Postby jonmoulton » Mon Aug 20, 2012 10:37 pm

"Also, in terms of the rate at which an enzyme acts, other than substrate concentration and reaction rate, are there any other conditions that would regulate the rate at which an enzyme works? Are there such thing as inherently "slower" or "faster" enzymes?"

Oh my goodness yes yes yes. Different protein structures have different rates of catalysis - a single amino acid change can alter or eliminate activity. Temperature and pH affect rate. Many enzymes are controllable by other enzymes -- look at allosteric regulation:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allosteric
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Postby JackBean » Tue Aug 21, 2012 9:15 pm

Assuming you mean regulation of rate of one enzyme, then you're interested in things such as posttranslational regulation (phosphorylation). As jonmoulton mentioned, allosteric regulators are important.
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

Cis or trans? That's what matters.
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Postby rk386 » Thu Aug 23, 2012 1:00 pm

So there is a difference between the regulation of the rate of one enzyme as compared to the regulation of the rate of many enzymes? How does the regulation of many enzymes work?
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Postby JackBean » Thu Aug 23, 2012 3:30 pm

What I meant is the regulation of enzyme produced by one gene. On the other hand, as jonmoulton wrote, you can have several genes and the respective proteins will have different amino acids in active side, they may be localized in different compartments etc. But I do not consider this much as regulation, because you must have the gene already, so it's not really something you can regulate, right?
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

Cis or trans? That's what matters.
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Postby rk386 » Thu Aug 23, 2012 11:10 pm

Do you mean that the same enzyme can be coded for by different genes?
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Postby JackBean » Fri Aug 24, 2012 2:49 pm

That's exactly what I mean. Actually most of enzymes is in form of isoenzymes coded by several genes.
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

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Re: Enzymes

Postby rk386 » Fri Aug 24, 2012 10:26 pm

Thanks for explaining.
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