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Oxidation

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Oxidation

Postby blackbird27 » Fri May 25, 2012 2:45 pm

I am a little bit confused by the biological oxidation. It is performed by the release of hydrogen instead of addition oxygen, right? And hydrogen acts as a proton. So why is NAD reduced instead of oxidized when it becomes positive? And following this logic, in biological oxidation are reducers donors, and oxidisers - acceptors of electrons? The respiratory chain carries electrons to the ultimate oxidizer - oxygen but aren't these electrons in fact the positively charged hydrogens from NAD.H2.
I know that these is a shambolic sum of questions but I'd be really grateful if you'd find the time to explain their answers to me.
Thanks! :)
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Postby JackBean » Fri May 25, 2012 4:02 pm

The oxidation can be performed by either release of hydrogen or addition of oxygen.
NAD+ is oxidized and it can become reduced NADH.
Yes, they are. Actually no, they are not, because electrons are not hydrogens. During redox reactions electrons are transferred. The hydrogens in NAD(P)/FAD are there only to make it electroneutral.
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

Cis or trans? That's what matters.
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Postby blackbird27 » Fri May 25, 2012 4:04 pm

Thanks :)
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