Login

Join for Free!
117148 members


The Most Primitive Respiratory System

Discussion of everything related to the Theory of Evolution.

Moderator: BioTeam

The Most Primitive Respiratory System

Postby chikis » Fri Feb 24, 2012 1:58 pm

Here is a question that I just came across while reading:

Which of the following has the most primitive respiratory system? A. Rat B. Fish C. Toad D. Grasshopper E. Lizard
I read thoroughly, with a view of having an answer to the question. Uptill now I have not made any success. Folks in the forum, please let's discuss it with a view of arriving at a correct answer.
chikis
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 42
Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2011 9:37 am

Postby JackBean » Fri Feb 24, 2012 2:24 pm

I would take it phylogeneticaly. Hardly can some insect have more developed respiratory system then mammal, can it?
This should probably help http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Respirator ... physiology
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

Cis or trans? That's what matters.
User avatar
JackBean
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 5669
Joined: Mon Sep 14, 2009 7:12 pm

Re: The Most Primitive Respiratory System

Postby Darby » Sat Feb 25, 2012 3:34 am

It's a really dumb question - just applying the word "primitive" indicates the questioner doesn't know what they're asking about...
Darby
Viper
Viper
 
Posts: 1262
Joined: Thu Mar 02, 2006 5:29 pm
Location: New York, USA


Postby chikis » Thu Mar 22, 2012 12:21 am

Darwins's theory of evolution is the widely held notation that all life forms is related and has descended from a common ancestor; the birds and the bananas, the fishes and the flowers.
Darwins's general theory presumes the development of life from non-life and stresses a purely naturalistic.
Looking at "embroyology", one of the evidence of evolution.
The embroyos (the earliest stage of and development of both plants and animals) of fish, reptile, birds and mammals are very similar and this are evidence that they evolved from a distant common ancestor. Embroyology shows that all have gill slits and tails in their embroyos like those of a fish.
I can use this theory to pick fish out as the animal that has the most primitive respiratory system. How about that?
chikis
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 42
Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2011 9:37 am

Postby Darby » Mon Mar 26, 2012 6:49 pm

If your choice were exclusively vertebrates, that might work...
Darby
Viper
Viper
 
Posts: 1262
Joined: Thu Mar 02, 2006 5:29 pm
Location: New York, USA

Postby chikis » Tue Mar 27, 2012 6:34 pm

@Darby
What do the word, "exlusive" meant in your last post in this thread? Explain, let me know how I will and what to reply.
chikis
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 42
Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2011 9:37 am

Postby Darby » Tue Mar 27, 2012 7:59 pm

The progression you gave was only applicable to vertebrates; a grasshopper would be out of the sequence entirely for respiratory systems.
Darby
Viper
Viper
 
Posts: 1262
Joined: Thu Mar 02, 2006 5:29 pm
Location: New York, USA

Postby Darby » Tue Mar 27, 2012 8:02 pm

Actually, I'd like to add that lungs aren't more advanced than gills, anyway, they're just a structure that works under different conditions. Gills are often much more efficient, since they need to get oxygen from a much lower environmental concentration. Just because fish have been around longer doesn't mean that gills haven't been evolving since they first appeared.
Darby
Viper
Viper
 
Posts: 1262
Joined: Thu Mar 02, 2006 5:29 pm
Location: New York, USA

Re: The Most Primitive Respiratory System

Postby chikis » Thu Apr 26, 2012 5:00 am

It is very obvious that grasshopper has the most primitive respiratory system but according to the past question and answer booklet where I got the question from, the answer there is fish and am dragging hard to get a concrete explaination to that.
chikis
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 42
Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2011 9:37 am

Re: The Most Primitive Respiratory System

Postby JorgeLobo » Fri Apr 27, 2012 1:39 am

chikis
"The embryos (the earliest stage of and development of both plants and animals) of fish, reptile, birds and mammals are very similar and this are evidence that they evolved from a distant common ancestor. Embroyology shows that all have gill slits and tails in their embroyos like those of a fish."

The ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny concept was rejected by science a long tme ago.

Conceptually one could assume grasshopper is the most "primitive" but what are the specific comparisons?
JorgeLobo
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 424
Joined: Mon Nov 17, 2008 12:12 am

Postby chikis » Mon Apr 30, 2012 10:22 am

@JorgeLobo,
What strong proof do you have to back the notion that grasshopper has the most primitive respiratory system?
chikis
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 42
Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2011 9:37 am

Re: The Most Primitive Respiratory System

Postby chikis » Sun May 13, 2012 12:16 am

For now, let me go with the crowd. I may find reason to chip in more idea in the future, maybe that will act as some kind of warmer to the thread.
chikis
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 42
Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2011 9:37 am


Return to Evolution

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

cron