life cycle of buffing and fission yeast

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angel92
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life cycle of buffing and fission yeast

Post by angel92 » Tue Mar 20, 2012 1:16 pm

can anyone tell me about the life cycle of fission and budding yeast separately??
I want articles as well as diagram.
if anybody knows
please help me
if you know about the website
tell me
I'm waiting...

JorgeLobo
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Post by JorgeLobo » Tue Mar 20, 2012 2:10 pm

yu can find all this on the net - from simple cell morphology diagrams to in depth dissectio of the cell division cycle.

angel92
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Post by angel92 » Wed Mar 21, 2012 8:42 am

i tried but could not find the site that explains life cycle of budding and fission yeast separately..
if you know send me link..
I will find out

JorgeLobo
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Post by JorgeLobo » Wed Mar 21, 2012 10:55 am

Do you seek cell division cycle diagrams (as in S, G1, etc) or simply the morphological observations?

angel92
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Post by angel92 » Wed Mar 21, 2012 1:59 pm

simply morphological observation.


marquitosgm
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Re: life cycle of buffing and fission yeast

Post by marquitosgm » Thu Mar 22, 2012 11:31 am

If we keep clear of an advanced level, the wikipedia article on yeast is good. And has a good picture.

As far as I've been able to work out, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and most other yeast species reproduce asexually by budding. However, others as Schizosaccharomyces pombe do it by fission. This asexual stage is haploid.

Nutrient shortage triggers sexual reproduction. Haploid cells conjugate (diploid stage) and then perform meiosis giving four sexual haploid spores (sporulation). Traditional theory states that DNA recombination during meiosis helps withstand stress conditions by producing new gene combinations that probabilistacally increase the ability to cope with natural selection. However a more recent line of thinking suggests that meiosis might have evolved as a molecular mechanism to repair damage caused to DNA by high levels of environmental stress.

Hope this helps and is not too obvious

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Post by marquitosgm » Thu Mar 22, 2012 11:36 am

Sorry, watch this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yeast

and this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schizosaccharomyces_pombe

hope this helps and is not too obvious

JorgeLobo
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Post by JorgeLobo » Thu Mar 22, 2012 2:32 pm

Please understand - there is no such thing as a "yeast species." Yeast is not a taxonmic classification - it's a morphology. It's generally assumed that any fungus can grow in that morphology under the right conditions and the morphology is not exlcusive to ploidy. We're most familiar with those fungi that exhibit the yeast mophology under routine culture conditions.

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