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May Mutated Genes Change there neighbour hoods.??????????

Genetics as it applies to evolution, molecular biology, and medical aspects.

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May Mutated Genes Change there neighbour hoods.??????????

Postby sachin » Sun Feb 05, 2006 2:03 pm

Tha will Confuse You But

Is any change in one gene hamppers change in its friend gene associated with it for synthsis of certein protein.

That means Dynamic change of genes to accomplish compatibility with change.

Image

I will write further later.

First give some quotes on current topic.
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Postby victor » Sun Feb 05, 2006 2:19 pm

it depends on what change is made...if the changes are duplication or deletion, then it sure will affect the neighborhood genes also.
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Postby sachin » Sun Feb 05, 2006 2:41 pm

victor wrote:it depends on what change is made...if the changes are duplication or deletion, then it sure will affect the neighborhood genes also.


Its Ok.

But I m saying about genes that are located on diffrent locii but associsted with each other.

Can Change in one make to change otrher?
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Postby 2810712 » Mon Feb 06, 2006 2:20 am

do you mean that if one of those associated genes mutates then in the course of evolution does the other gene get mutated too in order to be compatible to the firstly mutated gene?
Like genes for chains of haemoglobin, right?
I think it depends upon what kind of functional relation those genes have.
See the haemoglobin example. If the change in one of the haemoglobin chain is large enough to make it incompatible for the other chains... then the haemoglobin wouldn't form or br functional. If we assume that this mutation is present in 100% population, then those who have mutations in associated genes that make them compatible to the firstly mutatedgene product, would be 'naturally selected'. But the chance of such a compatiblizing mutation is same as that of other mutations...

Note that if such a lethal mutation [ like the haemoglobin chain mutation]
won't be present in 100% of population. But if the mutation isn't that lethal [ or the gene is not thaaat important] then due to some other selective advantage , the individuals having such a mutation would increase in number. Then compatible ones would be naturally selected as above.

This is what i think. Curious about your opinions...

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Postby sachin » Tue Jan 31, 2012 2:41 am

Yes! Meant the same.......
Thanx for your detailed explanation.

I do believe in evolution in organisms caused due to such mutation influences too.
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