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Hypotonic Solution

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Hypotonic Solution

Postby Brett » Mon Feb 21, 2005 8:53 am

I understand that plant cells thrive in hypotonic solutions because their cell have rigid cell walls that prevent bursting, is that correct?
Now what would happen if I would put an animal in such hypotonic solution?
Help much appreciated. :)
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Postby RobJim » Mon Feb 21, 2005 11:08 am

Every time you take a bath, you are putting an animal in a hypotonic solution. Animals have skin to protect themselves from this sort of thing.

If you put an animal cell in such a solution, it would burst. I think.
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Postby thank.darwin » Mon Feb 21, 2005 1:32 pm

Right Rob, it would have to be an animal cell... in a hypotonic solution. The opposite would occur if an animal cell were placed in a hypertonic solution. Our bodies are always trying to keep the solution around our cells isotonic so the cell doesn't burst or shrivel up.
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Postby mith » Mon Feb 21, 2005 4:58 pm

Just look at your skin when you've been swimming or bathing too long. Your skin expands from the water and wrinkles.
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Postby RobJim » Tue Feb 22, 2005 12:32 pm

Is that why it wrinkles? You learn something new every day.
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Postby thank.darwin » Tue Feb 22, 2005 1:24 pm

Is there not a layer of dead skin on our hands? Does that cause such wrinkles?
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Postby Gee_whiz » Wed Aug 03, 2005 3:53 pm

I always get confused between hypotonic and hypertonic.
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Postby sdekivit » Wed Aug 03, 2005 6:07 pm

Gee_whiz wrote:I always get confused between hypotonic and hypertonic.


when someone is 'hyper' he's extremely busy, so hypertonic means the solution means that there are many solved particles in it (more than in for example a cell) Because of this osmosis will occur and water will flow to the side where the most particles are (to undo the concentrationgradient). The cell will therefore shrink.

Hypo is the reverse, when there are a few solved particles in it (less then in for example the cell). That's why water will flow into the cell and may cause lysis of the cell.
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Postby sdekivit » Wed Aug 03, 2005 6:08 pm

thank.darwin wrote:Is there not a layer of dead skin on our hands? Does that cause such wrinkles?


when you wash you remove scales from the stratum corneum of the epidermis.
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Postby Jokkon » Wed Aug 03, 2005 9:35 pm

sdekivit wrote:
thank.darwin wrote:Is there not a layer of dead skin on our hands? Does that cause such wrinkles?


when you wash you remove scales from the stratum corneum of the epidermis.


osmosis occurs in any cells , dones't matter if the cell is dead or not, ur fingers wrinkle when u put ur hands in water because some of the water moves in by osmosis, and ur skin are being glued to ur tissues by soem sort of glue
I am just a high school student
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Postby Jokkon » Wed Aug 03, 2005 9:38 pm

Jokkon wrote:
sdekivit wrote:
thank.darwin wrote:Is there not a layer of dead skin on our hands? Does that cause such wrinkles?


when you wash you remove scales from the stratum corneum of the epidermis.


osmosis occurs in any cells , dones't matter if the cell is dead or not, ur fingers wrinkle when u put ur hands in water because some of the water moves in by osmosis, and ur skin are being glued to ur tissues by soem sort of glue. that way, ur skin doens't slip off ur tissues, u know when tarzan grabs a branch or anything , the skin won't slip..blahbllah. not sure if i am making any sense hahah
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Postby sdekivit » Thu Aug 04, 2005 7:56 am

Jokkon wrote:
sdekivit wrote:
thank.darwin wrote:Is there not a layer of dead skin on our hands? Does that cause such wrinkles?


when you wash you remove scales from the stratum corneum of the epidermis.


osmosis occurs in any cells , dones't matter if the cell is dead or not, ur fingers wrinkle when u put ur hands in water because some of the water moves in by osmosis, and ur skin are being glued to ur tissues by soem sort of glue


the stratum corneum is resistent to water, because it's keratinzed and there's a fat deposit between the keratinezed cells.
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