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"Model organism" for viruses?

About microscopic forms of life, including Bacteria, Archea, protozoans, algae and fungi. Topics relating to viruses, viroids and prions also belong here.

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"Model organism" for viruses?

Postby TheWalkingGlitch » Wed Oct 19, 2011 11:08 pm

When working with bacteria, we use E. coli as a "model organism" and try it first in experiments (because it is cheap, easy to grow, well-studied, etc), and if it works we move on to the bacteria we are really interested in.
When working with viruses, is there an analogous "model organism" to use? Or do we start right off with the pathogens?
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Postby aptitude » Thu Oct 20, 2011 5:59 am

I'm guessing bacteriophage T4, since that is used most commonly, especially in biotechnology.
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Postby JackBean » Thu Oct 20, 2011 7:14 am

if you want to study basic biology of the viruses (e.g. how they enter the cell, how they replicate etc.), you should use the same kind of virus you are interested in (like dsDNA virus with envelope). However, mostly you will probably use right the one you are specifically interested in because there are many differences.
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

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Re: "Model organism" for viruses?

Postby TheWalkingGlitch » Thu Oct 20, 2011 2:01 pm

Thanks, figured it would be some kind of phage because they're not harmful to humans.
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