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human genes

Genetics as it applies to evolution, molecular biology, and medical aspects.

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human genes

Postby calcite12 » Sat Feb 05, 2011 11:50 pm

Was wondering the number of genes in humans,and the organism with the most genes so far discovered and the one with the least number so far.
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Postby JackBean » Sun Feb 06, 2011 1:04 pm

Now it's anniversary of human's genome sequencing, so check Science's web page for some info. I think the current number is about 24 000 genes.
The one with least genes would be probably some small virus :)
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

Cis or trans? That's what matters.
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Postby calcite12 » Mon Feb 07, 2011 12:50 am

Thanks for the info JackBean.I saw on one of the science programs that when the genome project was going on we were thought to have twice as many genes,but that after much research it was found that some of our genes do 2 or 3 different jobs in the body.Again thanks for the info.Mike
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Postby JackBean » Thu Feb 24, 2011 8:21 am

I'm interested in that "2 or 3 different jobs", do you have some furthwer info?
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

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Postby DRT23 » Sun Feb 27, 2011 2:42 pm

Human genome has about 23,000 genes. As JackBean said, viruses have the least number of genes in their genomes. And the one with most genes is a zooplankton, Daphnia pulex, with 31,000 genes; according to this news: http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-02-cru ... enced.html. The record for the most genes can change in the course of time as new genome projects are conducted.

Some genes' primer transcripts can be spliced in alternative ways. So, one gene may lead production of different mature mRNAs and so that more than one polypeptide. Also, a polypeptide product of one gene can work in different multimer proteins which are consisted by two or more polypeptides. These are the reasons why one gene may have more than one task.
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Postby angel92 » Thu Mar 17, 2011 6:15 pm

the completion of the Human Genome Project was celebrated in April 2003 and sequencing of the human chromosomes is essentially "finished," the exact number of genes encoded by the genome is still unknown. October 2004 findings from The International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium, led in the United States by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) and the Department of Energy (DOE), reduce the estimated number of human protein-coding genes from 35,000 to only 20,000-25,000, a surprisingly low number for our species (7). Consortium researchers have confirmed the existence of 19,599 protein-coding genes in the human genome and identified another 2,188 DNA segments that are predicted to be protein-coding genes.

In 2003, estimates from gene-prediction programs suggested there might be 24,500 or fewer protein-coding genes (1). The Ensembl genome-annotation system estimates them at 23,299.
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