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White Blood Cells?

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White Blood Cells?

Postby AlwaysLost » Mon Apr 04, 2005 1:27 am

Looking for 6 Different Lymphocytes and their target organs, 6 different monocytes and their target organs, neutrophyls and target organs, 2 basophyls and their target organs and 5 eosinophyles and their target organ. If anyone has any information or informative website on these it would be greatly appreciated
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Postby Dr.Stein » Thu Jul 14, 2005 8:55 am

Different cells types... for instance 6 different lymphocytes, maybe they are 6 subsets of lymphocytes... and so on, or possibly phases during growing WBCs

Target organs... I have no idea about it. WBCs do not work in organ-based. They work in a whole body to protect them or immune system. All WBCs circulate in vessels, some lymphocytes stay in lymphoid organs due to antigen recognizing, monocytes will stay in tissues and mature as macrophages.

Functions:
1. Lymphocytes - depends on the subset, can be helpers, generating cytotoxic activity, producing antibody, to provide immune memory, APC.
2. Monocytes/macrophages - the main phagocyte, can function as APC too
3. Neutrophils - phagocyte
4. Eosinophils - act mainly in parasitic infection
5. Basophils - act mainly in allergic and hypersensitivity reaction
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Postby victor » Thu Jul 14, 2005 11:57 am

Dr.Stein wrote:Different cells types... for instance 6 different lymphocytes, maybe they are 6 subsets of lymphocytes... and so on, or possibly phases during growing WBCs

Target organs... I have no idea about it. WBCs do not work in organ-based. They work in a whole body to protect them or immune system. All WBCs circulate in vessels, some lymphocytes stay in lymphoid organs due to antigen recognizing, monocytes will stay in tissues and mature as macrophages.

Functions:
1. Lymphocytes - depends on the subset, can be helpers, generating cytotoxic activity, producing antibody, to provide immune memory, APC.
2. Monocytes/macrophages - the main phagocyte, can function as APC too
3. Neutrophils - phagocyte
4. Eosinophils - act mainly in parasitic infection
5. Basophils - act mainly in allergic and hypersensitivity reaction



I think you wrote it wrong Dr.Stein..Eosinophils acts mainly to response allergic..while Basophils acts to produce Heparine and Histamine..
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Postby Dr.Stein » Fri Jul 15, 2005 2:08 am

Have you read your new Immunobiology textbook?

Yes, eosinophils also act in allergy, like basophil do, this phenomenon will be obvious if they are initiated by mast cells that secretes chemotactic factor for them. While in parasitic infections (esp. helminths), eosinophils can act directly, triggered by those pathogens themselves. Also, allergy is not that much as parasitic infections, means that allergy is individual-dependent. Parasitic infections are more common to everyone.

Actually, the function of basophils is not yet clear. It is suggested that basophils are circulating mast cells. Basophils and mast cells are important effector cells in Th2-cell-dependent and IgE-associated in allergic disorder to and also immune responses to parasites.

Do you know what histamine and heparine is?
- Histamine is an important protein involved in allergic reactions. Allergies and asthma are two examples of histamine-mediated allergic responses.
- Heparine is an anticoagulant. Heparin possesses also non-anticoagulant properties, including modulation of various proteases, anticomplement activity, and anti-inflammatory actions. Inhaled heparin has been shown to reduce early phase of asthmatic reaction and suppress allergen induced rise in bronchial hyperreactivity. Heparin inhibits the acute cutaneous reaction due to allergens. In this mechanism heparin inhibits allergen induced mast cell degranulation and prevents subsequent development of reaction cascade leading to inflammation, bronchial hyperreactivity and asthma.

So? :wink:
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Postby victor » Sat Jul 16, 2005 12:30 pm

Ok...I've just read that chapter this afternoon and I got it. Basophils also act in hypersensitivity and they secreted histamine..thanks.. :lol:
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