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Bacteria's use of pyruvic acid

About microscopic forms of life, including Bacteria, Archea, protozoans, algae and fungi. Topics relating to viruses, viroids and prions also belong here.

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Bacteria's use of pyruvic acid

Postby bowzerwowzer » Tue Feb 23, 2010 8:12 pm

Is it possible for a bacteria to use pyruvic acid for energy, and if so, how many ATP molecules are generated from a complete catabolism of 13 molecules of pyruvic acid?
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Postby JackBean » Tue Feb 23, 2010 9:07 pm

of course, even you could use pyruvate as energy source.
But the yield depends on further metabolism. Will it be broken to down to CO2 or fermented to ethanol or other compound?
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

Cis or trans? That's what matters.
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Re: Bacteria's use of pyruvic acid

Postby bowzerwowzer » Tue Feb 23, 2010 10:45 pm

It will be broken down to CO2.
The answer I got was a total of 195 ATP if there are 13 molecules of pyruvic acid. After glycolysis, (asuming there are 13 molecules of pyruvic acid) the stages from pyruvic acid to the end of the kreb cycle there will be a total of 52 NADH and 13 FADH2 produced. And 13 ATP will be produced during the kreb cycle. Applying the rule that one NADH will produce 3 ATPs during the electron transport chain and one FADH2 will produce 2 ATPs during the same process, then 52 NADH will produce 156 ATPs and 13 FADH will produce 26 ATPs. Adding 156 ATPs, 26 ATPs and the previous 13 ATPs will equal to 195 ATPs.

Im not sure if this makes sense? Let me know what you think. Thanks.

http://www.life.umd.edu/classroom/bsci4 ... ummary.gif
Last edited by bowzerwowzer on Tue Feb 23, 2010 10:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby JackBean » Wed Feb 24, 2010 7:52 am

I didn't count the numbers, but looks fine. But as I mentioned before, you can't be sure, that BACTERIA will break the pyruvate down to CO2...
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

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Postby AndrewPhD » Thu Feb 25, 2010 6:28 pm

It would depend on the type of bacteria.
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Re: Bacteria's use of pyruvic acid

Postby bowzerwowzer » Thu Feb 25, 2010 11:05 pm

I see. Perfect. Thank you.
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