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prelamin A

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prelamin A

Postby kyle gilbert » Thu Jun 30, 2005 5:38 pm

I am not a scientist, but have been reading articles on prelamin A and Lamin A. I am finding this subject to be quite interesting in the fact that in finding that we can mature prelamin A with enzyme Zmpste 24, thus causing the cells to regenerate much slower and inducing aging. This of course is exciting in its possible uses in treating cancerous tumors, but I have a question that I feel is totally obvious yet I can find no information on. This is where my not being a scientist brings me here. My question is: If we can mature prelamin A, are we also finding the opposite? Is there a way to slow or prevent the maturation of prelim A? This not necessarily being a guarantee of a longer life, but with enhanced cell regeneration, the possiblilty of a life with fewer physical maladies attributed to aging.
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Postby MrMistery » Thu Jun 30, 2005 8:45 pm

In theory yes. In reality... many scientists are trying to find sopmething that will speed up regeneration by a lot of ways, not only the one you mentioned. So far, nobody has produced a miracle drug... But we are waiting...
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter
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Re: prelamin A

Postby zami'87. » Sat Jul 02, 2005 4:57 pm

kyle gilbert wrote:I am not a scientist, but have been reading articles on prelamin A and Lamin A. I am finding this subject to be quite interesting in the fact that in finding that we can mature prelamin A with enzyme Zmpste 24, thus causing the cells to regenerate much slower and inducing aging. This of course is exciting in its possible uses in treating cancerous tumors, but I have a question that I feel is totally obvious yet I can find no information on. This is where my not being a scientist brings me here. My question is: If we can mature prelamin A, are we also finding the opposite? Is there a way to slow or prevent the maturation of prelim A? This not necessarily being a guarantee of a longer life, but with enhanced cell regeneration, the possiblilty of a life with fewer physical maladies attributed to aging.

Hi!See about Hutchinson-Gilford progeria pages, I think it is related with lamin A.Search pubmed. Think it's possible. :?
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Postby kyle gilbert » Sun Jul 10, 2005 8:29 am

Well, some of what I have read has indicated that the effectivness of the Lamin A seems to dissipate with the loss of 18 amino acids. First question, does anyone know of a way to find out the origins of these amino acids? My searches have yet to turn up anything useful, but I am also new to a lot of this. Second, is it possible to replace these amino acids as they start to break down? I am assuming that by just ingesting a substance with the same amino acids would not necessaily mean that they would go to the Lamin A and "recharge" it.
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Postby zami'87. » Sun Jul 10, 2005 2:42 pm

ahhh don't agree. Maybe if u try with gene therapy-replace corrupted gene with healthy gene. Infect person by retrovirus that carries healthy version of gene.
:?
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Postby kyle gilbert » Tue Jul 12, 2005 5:43 am

Okay zami, do you know enough about this gene therapy to give me a laymans expalanation of how it works? Specifically, how does a healthy gene introduced to the body cause the others to follow suit? And how does a retrovirus work?
I am sorry, but I don't have a lot of knowledge in this stuff. I do appreciate you taking the time to edjucate me.
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