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the difference between Viruses and Bacteria.

About microscopic forms of life, including Bacteria, Archea, protozoans, algae and fungi. Topics relating to viruses, viroids and prions also belong here.

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the difference between Viruses and Bacteria.

Postby aubreyago » Wed Mar 11, 2009 8:12 pm

What is the difference between Viruses and Bacteria? I have looked, and haven't been able to find an answer. :|
Can someone help?
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Postby mith » Wed Mar 11, 2009 8:17 pm

look harder.
Living one day at a time;
Enjoying one moment at a time;
Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace;
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Postby CXCR4 » Wed Mar 11, 2009 8:43 pm

Viruses are tiny geometric structures that can only reproduce inside a living cell. They range in size from 20 to 250 nanometers (one nanometer is one billionth of a meter). Outside of a living cell, a virus is dormant, but once inside, it takes over the resources of the host cell and begins the production of more virus particles. Viruses are more similar to mechanized bits of information, or robots, than to animal life.

Bacteria are one-celled living organisms. The average bacterium is 1,000 nanometers long. (If a bacterium were my size, a typical virus particle would look like a tiny mouse-robot. If an average virus were my size, a bacterium would be the size of a dinosaur over ten stories tall. Bacteria and viruses are not peers!) All bacteria are surrounded by a cell wall. They can reproduce independently, and inhabit virtually every environment on earth, including soil, water, hot springs, ice packs, and the bodies of plants and animals.

Most bacteria are harmless to humans. In fact, many are quite beneficial. The bacteria in the environment are essential for the breakdown of organic waste and the recycling of elements in the biosphere. Bacteria that normally live in humans can prevent infections and produce substances we need, such as vitamin K. Bacteria in the stomachs of cows and sheep are what enable them to digest grass. Bacteria are also essential to the production of yogurt, cheese, and pickles. Some bacteria cause infections in humans. In fact, they are a devastating cause of human disease.

I Hope that help you out my friend , much success to you and your future goals
Peace out Brother
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Re: the difference between Viruses and Bacteria.

Postby Sepals » Thu Mar 12, 2009 4:34 pm

Tried a textbook OP?
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Re: the difference between Viruses and Bacteria.

Postby laserlipo » Wed Jun 10, 2009 6:37 am

Viruses are too small to be seen by the naked eye. They can't multiply on their own, so they have to invade a 'host' cell and take over its machinery in order to be able to make more virus particles.

Viruses consist of genetic materials (DNA or RNA) surrounded by a protective coat of protein. They are capable of latching onto cells and getting inside them.

Bacteria are organisms made up of just one cell. They are capable of multiplying by themselves, as they have the power to divide. Their shapes vary, and doctors use these characteristics to separate them into groups.

Bacteria exist everywhere, inside and on our bodies. Most of them are completely harmless and some of them are very useful. But some bacteria can cause diseases, either because they end up in the wrong place in the body, or simply because they are 'designed' to invade us.
Last edited by canalon on Fri Jul 24, 2009 9:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: the difference between Viruses and Bacteria.

Postby cocomartini » Thu Jun 11, 2009 5:33 am

I am using college textbooks Strauss's
Viruses and Human Disease

complete concept for Viruses and disease, easy to understand.
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Postby jacooper1993 » Fri Jul 24, 2009 4:09 am

Both are microscopic,
Bacteria can double its population in 20 minutes.
Viruses cannot multiply on their own and have to take over other cells to multiply.
Bacterial infections are easy to cure with the use of anti-biotics, where-as viruses can be insufferably hard to cure or vaccinate against. For example: We still don't have a cure for the common cold.

Sources: Biology teachers, Nelson Biology VCE Units 1&2
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Postby ankitakhemka » Thu Aug 06, 2009 12:12 pm

viruses - bacteria
1) they are showing both the - they are exclusively living forms.
characteristics of living
as well as non living.
2) they are crystallizable. - noncrystallizable.
3) are only parasitic in nature,
depend on host for all its - independent or may be saprophytic, parasitic, in nature.
necessary function.
4) uses host machinery for its - have ther own genetic material for replication.
replication.
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Re: the difference between Viruses and Bacteria.

Postby qqsvery » Thu Jan 21, 2010 5:07 am

aubreyago wrote:What is the difference between Viruses and Bacteria? I have looked, and haven't been able to find an answer. :|
Can someone help?

Image
this is Viruses,and that is a Bacteria as follow:


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A Strong Man Can Save Himself A Great Man Can Save Another.
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Postby xiaoluo » Thu Jan 21, 2010 8:18 am

the chief differece between them is , the virus can't live independently,but bacteria can
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Postby mkwaje » Fri Jan 29, 2010 12:55 pm

It seems a waste of time answering these questions when the asker can easily google them up or look it up in ANY biology or microbiology book. Especially, that the asker have not the decency to put neither a thank you nor a comment. Seems the effort of the experts here have gone to waste.

I agree to the 2nd post (by mith) that the poster should look harder. True, we all know the answer but if we spoonfeed all the answers to such obviously simple question makes us accomplices in making the poster lazy. Whereas, if we point him/her to the right direction, or give 'em a nudge...then we are teaching them to THINK.

We are not here as sages on the stage, but guides by the side.
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Postby sunghoo » Mon Mar 29, 2010 1:03 am

reproduction
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