Login

Join for Free!
118324 members


B.S and M.S in Bio, no job

Debate and discussion of any biological questions not pertaining to a particular topic.

Moderator: BioTeam

B.S and M.S in Bio, no job

Postby Magisto » Thu Jan 29, 2009 11:02 pm

Hi guys. First I'd like to say this is a great forum. I love the topic of biology and have studied it for the last 6 years of my life. I Went to Long Island University, brooklyn campus here in N.Y and i have a B.S in Biology and a M.S in Medical Microbiology.

Liu cost me about $18,000 a year, for 4 years.
Masters at LIU cost me around $25,000 for 4 semesters.

I now have 2 degrees the B.S and M.S and looking for jobs.

Unfortunately there really is almost none. Luckily i'm going off to Medical School next year but I just wanted to share this with you. Biology is a transitional degree, you can't really work with it, you need to get a PhD or MD or PA etc..

It's sad that after 6 years and so much student loans, the only job with a masters i can get is like a lab associate or research associate, getting 10 bux an hour =/

Any thoughts?
Magisto
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Jan 29, 2009 10:56 pm

Postby JorgeLobo » Fri Jan 30, 2009 11:57 am

Agree entirely. As an employer in a multinational company, I look for PhD and BS degree holders. The former is seen as having knowledge and technical drive and starts at a salary commensurate with their education. The latter is seen as technically able and wanting to get to work and starts at a lesser salary level. The MS is neither here nor there - seen as not having the drive to get a PhD nor being decisive enough to face the work world with a BS. Where we do hire MS - they are typically brought in at the level we'd hire a BS tho' paid a bit better based on their education.
JorgeLobo
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 424
Joined: Mon Nov 17, 2008 12:12 am

Re: B.S and M.S in Bio, no job

Postby Magisto » Fri Jan 30, 2009 5:20 pm

Yup totally agree with you. The MS degree i have is not worth the paper it is printed on. One of my good prof's has been telling me this all the time but i didn't listen.

The MS degree i have was a 36 credit program. It is mostly a theory degree, not much lab emphasis. The little lab exposure we did have was miniscule stuff such as:

basic tests on bacteria, API-20
staining like gram stains
streaking bacteria on different media,
SDS-PAGE electrophoresis

small stuff like this, but mostly lecture/textbook courses.

The MS program was MUCH easier than my undergraduate days, i feel like it's a degree for confused people, and i was confused. I'm taking my losses and going to medical school. VERY upset with this MS degree and the fact that even in New York, can't find a decent job with it.
Magisto
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Jan 29, 2009 10:56 pm


Re: B.S and M.S in Bio, no job

Postby JorgeLobo » Fri Jan 30, 2009 7:36 pm

In fact, my grad school experience was similar. In a hurry to get out, i decided to get an MS. My prof was clear - Ms is no good to my lab (as in meaningful publications) and no good for your career. It's either a PhD or I help you find another lab. So i went back to plan A.
Best advice I ever got.
JorgeLobo
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 424
Joined: Mon Nov 17, 2008 12:12 am

Postby MichaelXY » Wed Feb 04, 2009 2:04 am

Have you considered working as a CRA?
http://www.socra.org/html/certific.htm
User avatar
MichaelXY
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 885
Joined: Fri Jun 15, 2007 7:03 pm
Location: San Diego, Ca

Re: B.S and M.S in Bio, no job

Postby haleysweety » Thu Apr 23, 2009 2:51 pm

I am currently thinking about joining a nursing college or doing a BS degree online. I think the best way is to finish the BS degree and then start working. Besides a good education, practical experience is nowadays very important. If you work you can either decide to stop working and continue your studies in order to do the MS degree or you try to reconcile work and further education. I think I will try the latter one.
haleysweety
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2009 2:01 pm

Re: B.S and M.S in Bio, no job

Postby NateCat » Mon Apr 27, 2009 5:47 am

I am personally engaging in a BSc in Human Nutrition or possibly Dietetics. I still have a foundation year to complete first which is why I am not 100% sure of which degree I will be doing.

I would presume that specialising is a better approach with regards to career progression within a biological field. In other words, it is specific to a particular area of knowledge, as opposed to a general one.

"Biology", "chemistry" or something similar seems far too broad a subject to guarantee much success employment-wise. Unless you could show that you were focusing on a particular area then I would imagine most employers would see it as too broad.
NateCat
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Mon Apr 27, 2009 5:21 am
Location: UK

Postby MichaelXY » Mon Apr 27, 2009 6:54 am

If you look at saleries for nutrition degrees, you will be dissappointed, sorry to say.
User avatar
MichaelXY
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 885
Joined: Fri Jun 15, 2007 7:03 pm
Location: San Diego, Ca

Re:

Postby NateCat » Mon Apr 27, 2009 8:18 am

MichaelXY wrote:If you look at saleries for nutrition degrees, you will be dissappointed, sorry to say.


True... but it is a means to an end. I have to admit I was pretty appalled at the starting wages of Dietitians in UK but there are worse wages to be seen for graduates. I think most UK wages are poor in general for qualified people. It is a 4 year degree and dietitians start off at around £20,000 (that is pounds; not dollars)a year in the NHS. It can go up to around 30k and there are even some jobs advertised that are above that.

Self employment-wise It may seem like a difficult industry to break into but it is also one filled with "wannabe" nutritionists. My plan is to work self employed as a nutrition writer.
NateCat
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Mon Apr 27, 2009 5:21 am
Location: UK

Postby JennImme » Mon Jul 26, 2010 7:37 am

Last year I got online nursing degree and did not have any trouble finding a job. The largest teaching hospital in my area has a program for new nurses and it welcomes new nurses on a surprising number of units. Working as a care partner while you are in nursing school is one way to get a foot in the door. I didn’t do that but I still didn’t have any trouble getting three job offers after I graduated.
Last edited by JackBean on Mon Jul 26, 2010 12:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: link removed
JennImme
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Jul 26, 2010 7:32 am


Return to General Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests