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Yet another question on endergonic reactions

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Yet another question on endergonic reactions

Postby scienceteacher » Mon Dec 15, 2008 3:37 am

Good Evening,

I am trying to explain endergonic and exergonic reactions to my 10th grade AP Biology Class. I have a list of examples (eg. Photosynthesis, Chemical Reactions) but I really want to give them a very simple example. Does that make sense? I just want to be able to break it down further because I feel like they are having a hard time with it. Thanks for any advice!!
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Postby MichaelXY » Mon Dec 15, 2008 7:08 am

Burn a match to melt an ice cube. The match is exo, melting the ice takes heat energy such as in the match which is producing energy.
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Re: Yet another question on endergonic reactions

Postby jonmoulton » Mon Dec 15, 2008 4:38 pm

I like those instant-cold packs for sports injuries. They contain a salt that undergoes endergonic dissolution, so you break the inner pouch and the pack gets cold. That makes a nice hands-on demo of an endergonic process and is not dreadfully expensive.
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Postby MrMistery » Mon Dec 15, 2008 4:42 pm

that would demonstrate exothermic/endothermic rather than exergonic/endergonic. I am afraid there is no simple way to show exergonic/endergonic reactions since deltaG is a quantitative sum of enthalpy and entropy. Maybe an explosion would be the best example of an exergonic reaction because it releases heat and increases entropy. Lighting a match might be a substitute for that, because blowing up grenades in your classroom might not be the best idea. As for an endergonic process, you would need something that takes up heat and decreases entropy.
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Re: Yet another question on endergonic reactions

Postby jonmoulton » Mon Dec 15, 2008 8:10 pm

"that would demonstrate exothermic/endothermic rather than exergonic/endergonic."

Good point, the cold pack is not an appropriate demonstration of an endergonic system as there is an increase of entropy from mixing.
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Re: Yet another question on endergonic reactions

Postby keenangp » Tue Dec 16, 2008 1:42 am

How about a sponge?

Endergonic: The sponge absorbs the water (ie, energy) and now carries that energy, and can be expelled.

Exergonic: *Squeeze sponge* energy leaves the system (ie, sponge) and the sponge is no longer any good for scrubbing. Also, the water would normally leave the sponge of its own accord, but if you (an enzyme) squeeze the sponge, reactions occur much faster.

Ta daaaaa... :P
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Re: Yet another question on endergonic reactions

Postby FireceForGod » Tue Mar 31, 2009 6:35 pm

8) Another example for Endergonic would be pushing and boulder up a hill...the rock would be Endergonic-it is gaining energy. While you would be Exergonic-releasing energy.
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