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How can fibronectin relate to problem of cancer?

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How can fibronectin relate to problem of cancer?

Postby sundew773 » Tue Jun 28, 2005 6:55 am

This question is in my study guide...while I know fibronectin typically an Extracellular matrix protein that helps cells adhere to the matrix, I'm really not sure how it's involved in any way with the problem of cancer. :?
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Postby Chris4 » Tue Jun 28, 2005 9:25 am

I thought tumour cells were generally less adhesive than normal cells. This could mean that the cancerous cells could move from their original tissue as there is less extracellular matrix. Cancer becomes life threatening when cancer cells migrate to other tissues (metastasis).
This is confusing because i have read cancers contain high expression of fibronectin, which i explain below. But you say fibronectin helps cells adhere to the matrix. Which is what i originally thought, but i think the increased migration which fibronectin promotes is a greater factor here. Also even though there is overexpression of fibronectin there is also loss of other adhesion molecules like E-cadherin which give cancer cells the reduced adhesion to the extracellular matrix.

From what i understand fibronectin promotes migration of cells which as I mentioned above is something you don't want with cancer.

Tumours seem to contain higher levels of fibronectin (which makes sense). Another fact is that fibronectin is one of the few proteins whose production increases with age. You could make a link here between the increased risk of cancer when you get older.
As these cancerous cells have a higher concentration of fibronectin it means they can migrate more easily. Normally fibronectin would only be overexpressed in response to a wound. I read somewhere that cancer is a price we pay for our ability to repair wounds or injurys we suffer. Cells being able to migrate rapidly to the site surrounding the wound.

fibronectin also binds to integrins. I need to learn more about those :?

Cancer cells are known for their ability to avoid apoptosis (programmed cell death) and i've found a link between this ability and fibronectin http://www.jbc.org/cgi/content/full/278/50/50402

Is that ok? Im sorry thats a bit confusing. If i get time later i can make a summary. Which i promise will be no more than 5 lines. :lol: Or do you need to know more.
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Postby sundew773 » Tue Jun 28, 2005 5:38 pm

Thank you so much!! :D




Chris4 wrote:I thought tumour cells were generally less adhesive than normal cells. This could mean that the cancerous cells could move from their original tissue as there is less extracellular matrix. Cancer becomes life threatening when cancer cells migrate to other tissues (metastasis).
This is confusing because i have read cancers contain high expression of fibronectin, which i explain below. But you say fibronectin helps cells adhere to the matrix. Which is what i originally thought, but i think the increased migration which fibronectin promotes is a greater factor here. Also even though there is overexpression of fibronectin there is also loss of other adhesion molecules like E-cadherin which give cancer cells the reduced adhesion to the extracellular matrix.

From what i understand fibronectin promotes migration of cells which as I mentioned above is something you don't want with cancer.

Tumours seem to contain higher levels of fibronectin (which makes sense). Another fact is that fibronectin is one of the few proteins whose production increases with age. You could make a link here between the increased risk of cancer when you get older.
As these cancerous cells have a higher concentration of fibronectin it means they can migrate more easily. Normally fibronectin would only be overexpressed in response to a wound. I read somewhere that cancer is a price we pay for our ability to repair wounds or injurys we suffer. Cells being able to migrate rapidly to the site surrounding the wound.

fibronectin also binds to integrins. I need to learn more about those :?

Cancer cells are known for their ability to avoid apoptosis (programmed cell death) and i've found a link between this ability and fibronectin http://www.jbc.org/cgi/content/full/278/50/50402

Is that ok? Im sorry thats a bit confusing. If i get time later i can make a summary. Which i promise will be no more than 5 lines. :lol: Or do you need to know more.
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