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myasthenia gravis

Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Medicine. Anything human!

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myasthenia gravis

Postby teenager witch » Sun Feb 11, 2007 2:01 pm

helloo,
My friend is suffering from myasthenia gravis from she was nine year old. she is now 21 year old.she is taking some medicines to fight the symptoms.medicine is not that developed in my country and it is a rare disease here.Doctors are not very useful.We know how the disease happens but if anyone knows new studies about this or good diet or exrcises,experiences, any thing will help?
Myasthenia Gravis occurs in all races, both genders, and at any age. MG is not thought to be directly inherited nor is it contagious. It does occasionally occur in more than one member of the same family.

The voluntary muscles of the entire body are controlled by nerve impulses that arise in the brain. These nerve impulses travel down the nerves to the place where the nerves meet the muscle fibers. Nerve fibers do not actually connect with muscle fibers. There is a space between the nerve ending and muscle fiber; this space is called the neuromuscular junction.

When the nerve impulse originating in the brain arrives at the nerve ending, it releases a chemical called acetylcholine. Acetylcholine travels across the space to the muscle fiber side of the neuromuscular junction where it attaches to many receptor sites. The muscle contracts when enough of the receptor sites have been activated by the acetylcholine. In MG, there is as much as an 80% reduction in the number of these receptor sites. The reduction in the number of receptor sites is caused by an antibody that destroys or blocks the receptor site.

Antibodies are proteins that play an important role in the immune system. They are normally directed at foreign proteins called antigens that attack the body. Such foreign proteins include bacteria and viruses. Antibodies help the body to protect itself from these foreign proteins. For reasons not well understood, the immune system of the person with MG makes antibodies against the receptor sites of the neuromuscular junction. Abnormal antibodies can be measured in the blood of many people with MG. The antibodies destroy the receptor sites more rapidly than the body can replace them. Muscle weakness occurs when acetylcholine cannot activate enough receptor sites at the neuromuscular junction.

Common symptoms can include:
A drooping eyelid
Blurred or double vision
Slurred speech
Difficulty chewing and swallowing
Weakness in the arms and legs
Chronic muscle fatigue
Difficulty breathing
here is a good website:www.myasthenia.org
thank you for your cooperation
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teenager witch
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