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cool parasite video of snail getting takenover by fluke worm

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cool parasite video of snail getting takenover by fluke worm

Postby TheParasite » Thu Jan 11, 2007 12:04 am

Here is a cool video of a fluke worm that has taken over the nervous system of a snail if you guys have any more info on how these parasites takeover the minds of bugs you are more than welcome to share it with me!!!!


http://www.ebaumsworld.com/2007/01/parasite-snail.html
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Postby Darby » Thu Jan 11, 2007 10:41 pm

Several parasites reverse the instinct to flle the light in hosts, increasing the chances that the intermediate host will get eaten by the definitive host. In most cases, no one has figured out how the behavior change is accomplished. In sheep tapeworms, some tapeworm larvae physically eat part of the intermediate hosts' (ants) brain, supposedly only 4 cells, to bring the change about.

So far as I know, that's not what happens in the video - you're seeing the migration of parasite larvae into areas of the snail where they can be seen, with stripes and pulsing making them more obvious to the next host (birds, I think, in this case). I don't believe that this trematode also makes the snails move out into the open - and snails don't usually avoid the open, anyway, because they're camouflaged and, being slow, hard to spot moving.
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Postby TheParasite » Thu Jan 11, 2007 11:24 pm

thats really intresting but I belive that the worm controls the host by proteins that are released into the central Nervous system. How do the fluke worms make those colors in the tentacles the head looks imflammed.
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Postby Darby » Fri Jan 12, 2007 7:29 pm

You may be right, but so far as I know, the only actual work towards determining that was with acanthocephalans, and I don't think they were able to isolate anything. But I haven't really kept up with that that literature.

The assumption has always been that the chemicals are released into the blood and absorbed by the brain, rather than being put directly into the nervous system (mollusks have synapses like we do, it would be tough for chemicals to move through the system).

As I understand it, the stripes are actual larvae (the snail is where lots of larvae get produced), which express different colors to produce the contrast, and then flex to produce the pulsing. The snail's skin is transparent enough for the larvae to show through, especially as stretched as it is.
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Postby megarhyssa » Sat Feb 03, 2007 6:19 pm

Glad to see some discussion of this interesting phenomenon. I believe that Darby is more on target than TheParasite in terms of the way in which the parasite "hi-jacks" the snail (btw: snails aren't bugs, hemipteran insects are bugs) and catches the attention of potential final hosts (birds).

For a more technical write-up, I suggest visiting the following link, which also has its own movie (that I've shown in class, with a generally very favourable response):

Trematodes from Succinea sp.
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Postby TheParasite » Sat Feb 03, 2007 10:23 pm

thats awsome!!!!!!! if you have any more info share please :wink:
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Postby TheParasite » Sun Feb 04, 2007 3:08 am

how do the worms control the host?
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