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cellular respiration

Discussion of all aspects of cellular structure, physiology and communication.

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Big Test

Postby bioneedhelp » Tue Mar 08, 2005 11:29 pm

Hi, I have a huge test tomarrow on cellular respiration and I was wondering if anyone could give me any tips or any tricks in the facts that I should need to kno! I'll be back in half hour if anyone answers! PLease Answer! :wink:
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Postby mith » Wed Mar 09, 2005 1:07 am

Study the formula for respiration, and know the organs responsible.
Living one day at a time;
Enjoying one moment at a time;
Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace;
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Postby thank.darwin » Wed Mar 09, 2005 2:35 am

Great timing! I just had a test on cellular respiration... Here are a few good web sites...


http://www.sp.uconn.edu/~terry/images/anim/ATPmito.html

Animations of ATP production in the mitochondria. Thomas Terry of the University of Connecticut has created excellent animations of electron transport and the ATP synthease enzyme. These animations help to explain how electron transport generates an electrical gradient that provides the energy necessary to produce ATP. Click on the various links for different animations.

http://www.sp.uconn.edu/~terry/images/anim/ETS.html

Animations of electron transport in the mitochondria. You may reach this animation using links from the first address, since this is another animation produced by Thomas Terry.

http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/far ... kGlyc.html

Cellular metabolism and fermentation. This chapter of M.J. Farabee’s excellent online textbook will help you learn about both aerobic and anaerobic respiration.

http://users.rcn.com/jkimball.ma.ultran ... ation.html

A summary of the process of cellular respiration.

http://www2.nl.edu/jste/electron_transport_system.htm

Electron transport system. Hit the play buttons at the corners of the diagrams to view some nice animations. This is a really good visual representation of electron transport and chemiosmosis.

http://www.bact.wisc.edu/microtextbook/ ... foods.html

Fermentations of Importance to Humans. Examples of, and a brief discussion of how to make, some of the products of fermentation.

http://www.goaskalice.columbia.edu/0818.html

Muscle soreness and weightlifting. Alice explains why your muscles produce lactic acid and how you can avoid lactic acid production when weightlifting.

http://www.stolaf.edu/people/giannini/f ... nsport.swf

Another animation of electron transport. I can’t get enough of these. I am including so many illustrations of this concept because it is very important. Plus, these are neat to watch. Hit the GO button in the lower left corner to start the show.

http://www.jonmaber.demon.co.uk/glyintro/

Introduction to glycolysis. Go to the questions at the bottom and click on each one. You can use the arrows at the top of each question page to proceed. Lots of information here if you can work your way through the site. I found that the Quicktime animations worked better on my computer.

http://www.ruf.rice.edu/~bioslabs/studi ... isons.html

Use of metabolic poisons to study mitochondrial function. A brief list of poisons that inhibit mitochondrial functioning.

http://www.gwu.edu/~mpb/

Metabolic pathways of biochemistry. While in more detail than your text, this site presents you with excellent three-dimensional rotatable images of carbohydrate metabolism (glycolysis, Krebs cycle…), lipid metabolism, protein metabolism, and chemiosmosis (oxidative phosphorylation). I had some trouble connecting to the 3-D plug-ins.

http://old.jccc.net/~pdecell/cellresp/respoverview.html

Overview of cellular respiration. You can click on various regions of the map for a more detailed explanation of that component of cellular respiration.

http://instruct1.cit.cornell.edu/Course ... LYSIS.HTML

The miracle of fermentation. You will need Macromedia’s Shockwave player to view this animation on lactate (lactic acid) fermentation.

I can't take credit for any of this... my biology teacher gave this list to me! :D

Hope they help you as much as they helped me!
No amount of experimentation can ever prove me right; a single experiment can prove me wrong.
-Albert Einstein
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Great!

Postby bioneedhelp » Wed Mar 09, 2005 2:36 am

Excellent! Thanks!
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Postby thank.darwin » Wed Mar 09, 2005 2:39 am

You're Welcome! Enjoy the list and good luck on your test :D
No amount of experimentation can ever prove me right; a single experiment can prove me wrong.
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Test

Postby bioneedhelp » Thu Mar 10, 2005 1:20 am

I just had my cell respiration test and I bet I got a question wrong...if anyone has the answer...please respond.
A certain bacteria lives in the waters of Yellow Stone National Park. THe water is naturally filled with cyanide. Why haven't the organisms died?
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Postby Jelanen » Thu Mar 10, 2005 2:25 am

A certain bacteria lives in the waters of Yellow Stone National Park. THe water is naturally filled with cyanide. Why haven't the organisms died?


Cyanide (CN) acts as an electron arrestor, affecting the electron transport system, removing the electrochemical gradient and halting oxidative phosphorylation of ATP. Since this bacteria is unaffected by CN, it prolly generates all its required energy by glycolysis which functions perfectly well, CN or no CN. Fun question, makes you think (takes notes for future use)
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Postby adidasty » Thu Mar 10, 2005 10:28 pm

yeah thats definitely something good to think about. CN, along with some other compounds, do arrest electron transfer or capture electrons themselves therefore halting an electron transport system. most organisms that live in the presence of these compounds are either facultative anaerobes that can utilize the ETS when O_2 is present but also possibly obligate anaerobes that predominantly create ATP much more slowly by glycolysis and will die in the presence of molecular oxygen.
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bionewbie..i have a answer

Postby sophisticated_sensation » Mon Mar 21, 2005 10:34 pm

hey..
i am in high school too!(grade11)
and i just learned about the stuff u were talking about..
the process in which cell produce only about 2 ATPs and its an anaerobic process called fermentation
this process starts with glycolysis and since the body doesnot receive enough oxygen,so it produces lactic acid or alcohol.there are two types of fermentation [b]lactic acid fermentation[/b],it occurs in some bacteria and mammalian muscle cells . 2nd type is alcohol producing fermentaion, occurs in yeast and bacteria (used it production of wine)

hope this helps!
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Postby MrMistery » Fri Mar 25, 2005 9:10 pm

I am affraid you are terribly wrong sophisticated_sensation. There are 4 types of fermentations: lactic, alchoolic, butiric and acetic. Acetic permentation is the most controversed one because it an aerob process.
Fermentation produces a little more than 2 molecules of ATP: 16-30 kcal
If anyonw would like me to present this subject in a higher detail, tell me. I don't like writing things with no reason
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Postby mith » Fri Mar 25, 2005 11:10 pm

Hmm, I was taught 2 atp also....stupid ameican edumacation
Living one day at a time;
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Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace;
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Postby MrMistery » Sat Mar 26, 2005 11:22 am

Glycolysis realeses 2 molecules of ATP. Everyone knows that nothing in nature happens without a reason, so there must be a reason why the cell transforms piruvic acid into lactic acid or alcohol or any other of the products formed by fermentation. The reason is obvious: more energy. You will not find this in any book so do not look. If anyonw has a different opinion say so. I believe it is logical
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter
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