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The Color of blood

Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Medicine. Anything human!

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Re: The Color of blood

Postby Keeta242 » Tue Jul 20, 2010 12:34 am

brendon wrote:Actually, when blood is not oxygenated, (hasn't passed through the lungs), it IS blue. It's the reaction with nitrogen in the air that makes it red, which is why when you get a cut, or when it passes through your lungs, it's red.

Actually, this is just a myth. The truth is that your blood is an orange-red when it is in your vein, and hasn't come into contact with oxygen. When you get a cut, or the blood in some way leaves your body, it turns a darker shade of red. This is because of the small amount of iron. You see, it's so small, it rusts almost instantly, causing your blood to appear darker.
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Re: The Color of blood

Postby anesthesia » Mon Mar 12, 2012 12:29 am

Blood is RED. Blood is red whether it is arterial or venous. Only the shade of red changes. Anesthesiologists continuously monitor the oxygen saturation of patients in the operating room. While studying anesthesiology, Anesthesia residents are required to learn how the monitors work and the physics behind how the monitors work. All oxygen saturation monitors, both transmittance and reflective utilize red and infrared wavelengths of light to measure oxygen saturation because BLOOD IS RED. Blood is always red whether it is fully saturated with oxygen or in some partial state of oxygen saturation. Blood in the human body is always at least partially saturated with oxygen whether it is arterial or venous. Therefore, Blood is RED. It comes down to physics.
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Re:

Postby mustachemanwashere » Wed Oct 31, 2012 11:24 pm

Antje wrote:When it is in the viens it is a deeper red purple but the blue you see is the outer lining of the vein. By the way inuyasha is the best!! :wink:

inuyasha is the best
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