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How does a flower get bright color??

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How does a flower get bright color??

Postby samanosuke47 » Fri Oct 06, 2006 12:32 pm

I dont know how a flower get bright color?I know gen do it but explain to me clearly,please?Thanks.
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Postby madxientist » Fri Oct 06, 2006 3:00 pm

It's kinda tough question to reply.

Looooooong times ago, there are many flowers and their color were maybe green(I think it' reasonable because it's easier to flower to make green flower, for they already have had green pigment in their stem. leaf)

And some mutant flower arosed. for their brighter color, more bugs come to these flowers. As you know, bugs help flower to polinate. in this way, bright flowers successfully thrift than other green plants.

The game is over now. bright color flowers survived, and dark ones are out.

so... now we see only bright ones



Did u understand my poor english? I'm Asian; so I'm quietly afraid of if you can't get my reply
VERITAS LUX MEA
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Postby dipjyoti » Fri Oct 06, 2006 5:41 pm

The color that you see in flowers is actually the result of reflected light from various plant pigments.
A group of compounds called "anthocyanidins" are the basic ingredients. They are named for the flowers in which they were first found, such as the scarlet "pelargonidin" from the geranium or Pelargonium, the purple "petunidin" from the Petunia, or the blue-violet "delphinidin" from the Delphinium.
It is these anthocyanidin pigments that biotechnologists are studying to change flower colors. For instance, they've taken the scarlet pelargonidin-producing gene from corn and placed it into petunias to give this flower a novel orange color.
The gene for delphinidin (blue-violet) has been placed into carnations to make some blue. Other factors within the cell, such as the acidity (pH) and even cell shape, are making the genetic production of blue mums and roses a bit more challenging.

Combine the anthocyanidin compounds with sugar in plants to produce the more common "anthocyanin" pigments responsible for our fall leaf colors, among other colors. There are other pigments in leaves as well, such as the flavonols (yellow) and, of course, chlorophyll (green). Flavonols, and the colorless (to us) flavonoid pigments, not only affect the color caused by primary pigments (co-pigmentation), but by absorbing ultraviolet light they also are readily seen by insects.

I THINK, IT HAS ANSWERED YOUR QUESTION!
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RESEARCH WORKER ON WETLAND. MEMBER OF RAMSAR; GLAND, SWITZERLAND. MEMBER OF EPILEPSY FOUNDATION; CONNECTICUT.
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Postby samanosuke47 » Sun Oct 08, 2006 12:44 am

thank u very much,but I need some resources.Please show me where I can find it.I found everywhere on Internet,but nothing.Hix,In my library,many books,But I dont know what a book consider this topic.Then....
Thax for helping me again.
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Postby dipjyoti » Tue Oct 10, 2006 2:22 pm

SEARCH IN GOOGLE OR WIKI BY, PIGMENTS+FLOWER.

WELCOME!!! WE ARE ALWAYS FOR ANSWERING YOUR QUERRY!
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Postby Amrik » Tue Oct 10, 2006 2:28 pm

@dipjyothi
please try not to use all caps as it is a sign for anger (sum1 will surely tell u tht!)
- There Is A Solution For Every Problem We Humans Have

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Postby samanosuke47 » Sat Oct 14, 2006 7:04 am

Thank u all of u guy,especially "dipjyoti".I'm just a student,then I need some help.This forum is very useful for me.Thanks
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Postby dipjyoti » Sat Oct 14, 2006 9:55 am

Welcome "samanosuke47"! Sorry, that I used Caps lock, but Amrik it always does not mean I'm angry.
In our place Internet connection is quite costly. N i was in hurry thats why i forget to made it small.
Xtreamly sorry 4 it!!!

Dip Jyoti Chakraborty.
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Postby megarhyssa » Sat Feb 03, 2007 6:36 pm

I realize that the original question was probably regarding a proximate mechanism (i.e., what is in flowers that gives them a particular colour?), but there is another, considerably more interesting, question here: why are so many flowers brightly coloured? And, what mechanisms promote variation within and among species in flower colour?

While a proper answer is beyong the scope of this forum, I did want to point out a false statement in madxientist's response (skipping over the simplistic presentation of the origin of bright colours in angiosperm flowers). The statement:

"The game is over now. bright color flowers survived, and dark ones are out. so... now we see only bright ones"

ignores the thousands of angiosperm species that are wind pollinated (and, hence, don't need to attract pollinators), and/or dioecious (which often rely on generalist pollinators, rather than bees or hummingbirds), and/or attract pollinators by scent, etc. If you'd like to see for yourself, try typing "green flowers", "brown flowers" or "wind pollinated flowers" into Google Images.
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Postby MrMistery » Sat Feb 03, 2007 8:32 pm

most flowers have bright colors in order to atract specific polinators. And most organisms have a peak of vision somewhere in the blue or red spectrum, with small variations.
While exceptions occur from every rule, most flowers are not green. that is in order to distinguish the flower from the rest of the plant, and make it easier for the polinatior to find the polen source.
White flowers are also an interesting case: the reflect UV light. Their polinators can see UV light. So in a sense they have bright colors, just that we can't see them..
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter
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