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Neurology: Questions

For discussing the functions of different structures of all organisms.

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Neurology: Questions

Postby Mansfield » Fri Sep 08, 2006 4:09 pm

Hello,

I would be glad to get an answer for the following questions: 1. Does the brain stop producing neurons when puberty ends?
2. Do unused neurons in the brain die during puberty and/or afterwards? If they do, what are the consequences?

Thanks.
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Postby fluktuacia » Sat Sep 09, 2006 7:17 am

Are new neurons produced in brain after birth? i've always thought that after birth (or even soon) their number is not increasing, because of their lack of division ability
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Postby Linn » Sat Sep 09, 2006 12:18 pm

The adult brain is able to produce new neurons but production is not as adequate as when young.
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Postby Dr.Stein » Sun Sep 10, 2006 9:52 am

Neuron is produced along with growing and developing period of individuals. The function will be optimum during learning process. If individuals do not use their brain properly, the function will be suppressed. There is a possibility that neuron will be rudimenter if they are unused.

Neuron, as another cells, has a specific life span, means that after some period it will die. This neuron death is marked by slow remembering and forgetfullness of ageing individuals.
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Postby victor » Sun Sep 10, 2006 10:01 am

Well, if anybody feel strange about the "aging" word above. please read:
http://www.biologynews.net/archives/200 ... aging.html

And nowadays, luckily, we can stimulate those nerve cell. Read this:
http://www.biologynews.net/archives/200 ... brain.html

Hope they help... :lol:
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A: They have all the solutions.
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Postby Linn » Sun Sep 10, 2006 2:31 pm

This is a good thing for me :) that the brain is able to repair damage:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 133621.htm

http://www.stanford.edu/group/hopes/tre ... hd/u4.html

there is a lot of info on this subject if you are interested to research:

http://aolsearch.aol.com/aol/search?enc ... r&ie=UTF-8
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Postby baikuza » Wed Sep 13, 2006 10:35 am

Linn wrote:The adult brain is able to produce new neurons but production is not as adequate as when young.


as i know.. neuron can not be produced again after we are adult..
then if is, it is only the regeneration of the axon.
once you lost your neuron.. it will can not be replaced..
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Postby Dr.Stein » Thu Sep 14, 2006 3:52 am

baikuza wrote:as i know.. neuron can not be produced again after we are adult..
then if is, it is only the regeneration of the axon.
once you lost your neuron.. it will can not be replaced..

"Loss of brain cells is a common pathological event in many brain diseases. The brain has the capacity to generate new neurons (neurogenesis) in adult life, but the rate of new neuron production is inadequate to replace the significant loss of brain cells that occurs in neuro-degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's Disease (AD), Parkinson's Disease (PD), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Huntington's Disease (HD), and in neurologic "accidents" such as head trauma, spinal cord injury and stroke..."

by Juan Sanchez-Ramos, Ph.D., M.D.
University of South Florida

For reading full article, click here: http://www.byrdinstitute.org/research/g ... nerod.aspx
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