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Gopherwood Range Theory

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Gopherwood Range Theory

Postby Garry Denke » Thu Jun 29, 2006 8:40 am

Gopherwood Range Theory
John Denke, Biology 101
University of North Texas
Fall Semester, 1999 AD

Abstract

Biologists know that gophers are found only in the Western Hemisphere. The gopher tortoise, species Gopherus polyphemus, is its eldest endangered species living in a certain Southeastern U.S. range. Also living within this range is the resilient Southern live oak, species Quercus virginiana. Its naturally-curved massive branches were used exclusively for the strongest shipbuilding frames. "Old Ironsides", the oldest commissioned ship still afloat in the world, is built from these Southeastern U.S. gopher's wood's forests. Thus, the ark's "gopherwood" name, "gopher wood", is identical to the species of wood in USS Constitution's frame, according to theory. Quercus virginiana (after Philip Miller, botanist)

Other biologists suggest three of the four known Gopherus living species: G. agassizii, G. berlandieri and G. flavomarginatus. However, all three range in non-forested areas. Ancient stone anchors, similar to 5,000-year-old anchors found at Bimini and the Middle East, are common in U.S. Gulf Coast hurricane flood zones.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gopher_wood

GDG

I know very little about biology,
does this abstract hold water?

Thank you.
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Postby Darby » Fri Jun 30, 2006 2:19 am

Is there supposed to be some sort of point in this abstract somewhere?
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Postby alextemplet » Fri Jun 30, 2006 2:44 am

Some translations indicate that the ark was made of cypress, not gopherwood. I'm personally not sure which wood it was; I think it might just be a translation error.
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Postby damien james » Fri Jun 30, 2006 4:07 am

Yes. I agree with Darby. What is point? Also I almost went to UNT in Denton. But it was not very good school I did not think.
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Postby Garry Denke » Fri Jun 30, 2006 5:41 pm

Here is one last pitch of John's range theory.

Our core samples of Noah's ark are Quercus virginiana. That's the current problem. John's notebooks say Constantine Rafinesque named genus Gopherus. I read that's true. His notes say he had to. Why? Because Carolus Linnaeus had already named genus Quercus. The species name virginiana was gone too. John says Carolus named the species. Several sites say Philip Miller did. Which is it? Obviously neither of them, Carolus nor Philip, knew about the core samples.

Is a Southern live oak native to Virginia, he asks here, is it virgin Virginian? John writes, yes, of course, but at the range's extreme northeast edge. Francois Daudin had named species polyphemus already. The name Quercus (Carolus') was gone, the name virginiana (Carolus' or Philip's) was gone, and the name polyphemus (Francois') was gone, so Constantine named the genus Gopherus, according to John, for a common range. Noted here is western US was a frontier area not known (classified) yet. Was genus Gopherus and its species polyphemus classified first? Here it says it was, before the remaining three Gopherus' species were. John says it was Constantine's only choice at the time, but I disagree.

The question is did Constantine know the ark was Southern live oak? John says yes, he knew. I say no, he didn't know. If he did know about the ark's core samples, then the Gopherwood Range Theory holds water. On the other hand if Constantine didn't know, then the common range naming of Southern live oak and Gopher tortoise at the time is nothing more than a coincidence. Best I can tell, neither Carolus, Philip, Francois, nor Constantine, knew.

Verification that Noah's ark gopher wood is Southern live oak (Quercus virginiana) by independent laboratories is expected soon. Should the University of North Texas student's 1999 classification be disproven, these notebooks will be pitched.

Thanks.
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Postby Linn » Sat Jul 01, 2006 2:11 am

should'nt this be in botany forum? :?

of course the tests on the recent archeological find in Iran, will show what kind of wood. But how to know it is THE Ark?

Cedars of Lebanon were used to build back in the days.

If it proves to be the same species as southern Oak that would be an interesting topic as to how?
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Postby alextemplet » Sat Jul 01, 2006 3:13 pm

Wait, nobody ever found Noah's Ark, how did they get core samples?
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Postby Garry Denke » Sat Jul 01, 2006 6:28 pm

alextemplet wrote:Wait, nobody ever found Noah's Ark, how did they get core samples?

By hollowstem coring the arks' (both) locations then comparing the core samples. It was quite easy. Cored wood species from 8ft below GL at Heelstone was identical to cored wood species from 40ft below GL at Noah's Ark. Here's the short version from Cayce Enterprises, Inc.

8ft below GL at Heelstone: Southern live oak; Quercus virginiana
40ft below GL at Noah's Ark: Southern live oak; Quercus virginiana

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Heelstone
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Gopher_wood

'Round these parts Alex we call it Plano simple.

Follow links.
Last edited by Garry Denke on Sat Jul 01, 2006 9:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby alextemplet » Sat Jul 01, 2006 7:09 pm

Garry Denke wrote:
alextemplet wrote:Wait, nobody ever found Noah's Ark, how did they get core samples?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Gopher_wood

Follow links.


I'm having trouble with some of these links. You might need to be a bit more direct with me. Can you post the exact links that I'm supposed to be looking at?

But as for which type of wood it was, I prefer this theory:

Several guesses as to the nature of gopher wood have been made, the most common of which is the cypress. Adam Clarke, a Methodist theologian famous for his commentary on the Bible, cited the Greek word for cypress, kuparisson, and the resemblance of this word's base, kupar to the Hebrew word gophar.

Quoted from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gopher_wood

I've seen Bibles that do translate it as cypress.

If you don't mind, could you please post links that directly deal with such core samples? My browser's being a pain. My apologies for the inconvenience.
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Postby Linn » Sun Jul 02, 2006 12:15 am

"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these".

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Postby Garry Denke » Sun Jul 02, 2006 3:32 am

Kopher means something by which one covers something, hence pitch. The derivation of the pitch, whether it be petroleum, or botanically based, is not relevant to its definition.

http://www.worldwideflood.com/ark/pitch/pitch.htm

Noah's ark core samples and the Heelstone core samples contain a residue of Pinus palustris pine tar from the Longleaf pine. Pinus palustris, after Philip Miller, botanist.

http://www.maritime.org/conf/conf-kaye-tar.htm

Any pine trees in Southeastern U.S.?
Any gophers there?
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