Login

Join for Free!
118859 members


Cork cambium

Plants!

Moderator: BioTeam

Cork cambium

Postby statesman » Tue Jun 20, 2006 1:13 pm

In the Campbell text, it says
"Unlike the vascular cambium, cells of the cork cambium do not continue to divide; thus, there is no increase in its circumference."

I don't get it. Cells of the cork cambium do divide, don't they? They produce the cork cells.
statesman
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Jun 12, 2006 3:48 pm

Postby Nawal » Tue Jun 20, 2006 6:33 pm

The cork cambium cells that are produced for the phloem or epidermis .they are boxlike and became impregnated with suberin[a waxy substance that make the cell impervious to moisture],these cells die shortly after they formed. So they don’t dived .
Nawal
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2005 9:03 pm

Postby statesman » Wed Jun 21, 2006 12:04 am

Those are the cork cells, aren't they, not cork cambium?
statesman
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Jun 12, 2006 3:48 pm


Postby mith » Wed Jun 21, 2006 12:38 am

I think statesman is right, cambium by definition produces new cells..
Living one day at a time;
Enjoying one moment at a time;
Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace;
~Niebuhr
User avatar
mith
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 5345
Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2005 8:14 pm
Location: Nashville, TN

Postby Linn » Wed Jun 21, 2006 12:50 am

well ya thats what it produces and then it becomes bark which purpose is protection and to prevent water loss, so the cell does not need to keep living since its function is done.

Can sorta liken it to our nails. :wink:
"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these".

~ George washington Carver
User avatar
Linn
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 1735
Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2006 3:53 am
Location: Massachusetts, USA

Postby statesman » Wed Jun 21, 2006 11:52 am

Yup...
So, Campbell's wrong?
statesman
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Jun 12, 2006 3:48 pm

Postby Linn » Wed Jun 21, 2006 4:18 pm

AHH :?
No he's not :idea:
"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these".

~ George washington Carver
User avatar
Linn
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 1735
Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2006 3:53 am
Location: Massachusetts, USA

Postby SU_reptile » Sat Jul 01, 2006 10:32 pm

As far as I remember from General botany vascular cambium, or more profesionally named the phellogen, does divide.
As well as vascular cambium, phellogen divides more often in the way we call the pericline division i.e. the division increases the number of layers of cells - it's parallel to the surface of the stem. In that way the phelloderm and the phellem (cork) are produced by the phellogen. But, as we all know, as the plant gains in girth, cambium and phellogen need to undergo a series of anticline divisions i.e. the division is perpendicular to the surface of the plant. By the means of anticline division cambium and phellogen produce new cells in their circles (in the same row/layer).
So taking that into consideration and comparing it with information stated in Campbell's book, that second one is wrong. Of course if you quoted that sentence to us.
Last edited by SU_reptile on Mon Jul 03, 2006 6:47 am, edited 1 time in total.
SU_reptile
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 145
Joined: Mon May 01, 2006 6:38 pm
Location: Katowice - Poland

Postby SU_reptile » Sat Jul 01, 2006 10:36 pm

The cork cambium cells that are produced for the phloem or epidermis


I don't understand that sentence.
SU_reptile
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 145
Joined: Mon May 01, 2006 6:38 pm
Location: Katowice - Poland

Postby SU_reptile » Wed Jul 05, 2006 10:45 am

OK. I found the part suggesting that there is no further division in cork cambium (phellogen). But there is also written that as stem or root gain in girth, old phellogen lose its meristematic properties and new one arises (from secondary phloem or deeper layers of cortex that didn't rupture). That phenomenon repeats and characteristic creation arises, namely the rythidome.
We need to emphasize that such processes are not applied to every kind of plant.
I took a look at my reference books and compare those informations. Eventually, it is true that both phenomena occur in plants growth.
SU_reptile
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 145
Joined: Mon May 01, 2006 6:38 pm
Location: Katowice - Poland


Return to Botany Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest