Login

Join for Free!
118820 members


Viruses and Bacteria

About microscopic forms of life, including Bacteria, Archea, protozoans, algae and fungi. Topics relating to viruses, viroids and prions also belong here.

Moderator: BioTeam

Viruses and Bacteria

Postby Christopher » Sat Apr 09, 2005 6:13 pm

What type of viruses and bacteria do you get,and what is the advantages and disadvantages of viruses and bacteria for humans? :?
Christopher
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2005 6:05 pm

Postby MrMistery » Sat Apr 09, 2005 7:20 pm

Many bacteria live in the digestive tract of humans, helping us in this procces. They are liviung in mutualistic symbiothis. All parazites(bacteria and viruses) bring only disadvantages, NO ADVANTAGES
Last edited by MrMistery on Sat May 14, 2005 10:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter
User avatar
MrMistery
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 6832
Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 10:18 pm
Location: Romania(small and unimportant country)

Postby biostudent84 » Sat Apr 09, 2005 7:27 pm

MrMistery wrote:Many bacteria leave in the digestive tract of humans, helping us in this procces. They are leaviung in mutualistic symbiothis. All parazites(bacteria and viruses) bring only disadvantages, NO ADVANTAGES


Don't forget that some viruses do not negatively affect us, but they give us immunity to other pathogens. Cowpox virus can be injected into a human and make him or her immune to smallpox.

Also, with the fact that viruses inject genetic material into cells, they are being investigated to determine if they can be used for gene therapy. To cure, rather than treat, genetic diseases.
User avatar
biostudent84
Site Admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 974
Joined: Thu Nov 11, 2004 6:00 am
Location: Farmville, VA


Postby MrMistery » Sat Apr 09, 2005 7:33 pm

They can be used Kyle: i saw a documentary on discovery... It's already been done. I don't remember any details though... I think the first such desease was SCID. It hasn't been cured, but it has such a genetic treatment
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter
User avatar
MrMistery
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 6832
Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 10:18 pm
Location: Romania(small and unimportant country)

Postby adam00f » Thu Apr 21, 2005 5:09 am

the intresting thing about a bactria and viruses is that how they evolve Ig antibiotics for bacteria u have to finish all ure medcine to kill the bacteria or the strong bacteria will survive become stronger and reproduce in like 20 min..and if they grow stronger you will probaly have to get a stronger antibiotic to fight it off...lol thats what pisses off my mom when i dont finish my medcine lol..

adam
Summer schedual/ gotta cram all chemo info and i have water polo practice 3 tiomes a day!!!!!!!..frick i nned some sleep!!
User avatar
adam00f
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 44
Joined: Tue Mar 08, 2005 3:49 am
Location: Califorina

Postby drstewart_ny » Sat Apr 23, 2005 5:51 am

This is not a simple subject, nor are there simple answers.
I think the worst thing about a viral or bacterial infection are the toxins these pathogens excrete; and, as they die, their dead bug bodies become toxic as well.
I'll throw in a kicker. Parasites. There was a time when our immune systems could fight off a great many irritants, but not any more.
We are bombarded by 3 million different toxins each year, our immune systems have become exhausted. Allergic reactions are the norm now.
Which would be worse, getting a cold or being exposed to droplets of diesel fuel in the air on a daily basis? Would being exposed to Scotchguard molecules in the air every day (these having been found all around the world in leaves, even in the rainforest) debilitate you to the point where you might catch a cold?
drstewart_ny
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 32
Joined: Fri Apr 08, 2005 4:38 pm

Postby muntedkowhai » Sat May 14, 2005 9:16 pm

for the gene therapy virus, most often baculoviruses are used for gene therapy as they have been proven to enter numerous human host cells without integrating their own genome into the host genome.

and there are many microogranisms that have advantageous affects on humans (granted that they are not parasites) such as the numerous staph epidermis that lives on our skin and secrete acid so that it makes the environment too acidic for potential pathogens to live in, e.coli in our gut to help with our vitamin K, species of pseudomonas that break up components of fuel when there is a oil spill in the ocean, and all the micro organisms that degrade and make organic materials in the soil.
muntedkowhai
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat May 14, 2005 1:34 am
Location: Dunedin, New Zealand

Postby MrMistery » Sun May 15, 2005 6:44 pm

Here is a fun thing to know: there are more E.coli cells in the human body than humnan cells
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter
User avatar
MrMistery
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 6832
Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 10:18 pm
Location: Romania(small and unimportant country)

all orgs are impt

Postby yuriandre » Sun May 15, 2005 7:15 pm

I think that all organisms on earth whether they are parasites or virtually non-parasitic organisms offer some advantages to humans. Macro-parasitic organisms like ascaris also offers some advantages for food processing. These worms digests a rather indigestible fibrous/ cell-wall component of a vegetable/plant that we eat making its by-products readily available for us to digest more fully for other usage. All creatures on earth are important although the one we recognise as ecologically important are most of the time impressed on everybody's mind, overlooking the advantages of other organisms at the backstage of ecological food-web.
yuriandre
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Sun May 15, 2005 7:13 pm
Location: Philippines

yes!

Postby yuriandre » Sun May 15, 2005 7:21 pm

drstewart_ny wrote:This is not a simple subject, nor are there simple answers.
I think the worst thing about a viral or bacterial infection are the toxins these pathogens excrete; and, as they die, their dead bug bodies become toxic as well.
I'll throw in a kicker. Parasites. There was a time when our immune systems could fight off a great many irritants, but not any more.
We are bombarded by 3 million different toxins each year, our immune systems have become exhausted. Allergic reactions are the norm now.
Which would be worse, getting a cold or being exposed to droplets of diesel fuel in the air on a daily basis? Would being exposed to Scotchguard molecules in the air every day (these having been found all around the world in leaves, even in the rainforest) debilitate you to the point where you might catch a cold?


that's true. however, most of the time, the organisms we consider as normal flora (symbiotic organisms ) of our body can cause harm when they are not present in their usual anatomical location. For example, if the symbiotic organisms living in our large intestine gets into our eyes, it will definitely cause some harm to some extent.
yuriandre
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Sun May 15, 2005 7:13 pm
Location: Philippines

Postby MrMistery » Sun May 15, 2005 7:30 pm

Ever wondered why when you eat fruit and then drink water you get diareea? It is because this creates the perfect conditions for the E.coli cells to divide. So here is something different: a bacteria staying where it usually stays, but because there are more cells of it it causes trouble
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter
User avatar
MrMistery
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 6832
Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 10:18 pm
Location: Romania(small and unimportant country)

Postby canalon » Tue May 17, 2005 1:14 pm

MrMistery wrote:Here is a fun thing to know: there are more E.coli cells in the human body than humnan cells


Not exactly true. There are more bacteria in the human body than human cells. But E.coli, though being the most abundant aerobic bacteria represents less than 1% of your flora (mostly intestinal). The rest is made of anaerobic bacteria, and there are 10 times more of those bacteria than human cells on average.

drstewart_ny wrote:I think the worst thing about a viral or bacterial infection are the toxins these pathogens excrete; and, as they die, their dead bug bodies become toxic as well.


Hmmmm... Once again this is not exactly true. It is true that some bacteria harm their hosts by mean of their toxins. I would not say that for the viruses. They do harm their hosts by killing the cells they use for their replication.
Interestingly some antibiotics used to treat some bacterial infections are sometimes making things worse. Some penicillins by destroying the cell walls release toxic peptides in the host, and E. coli O157:H7 reacts to antibiotic by activating the SOS response (stress activatedmechanism) that increases its toxin production. Hence killing people because of the cure...

yuriandre wrote:I think that all organisms on earth whether they are parasites or virtually non-parasitic organisms offer some advantages to humans.


I don't think so. What benefits could we have from say Ebola, polioviruses, smallpox, HIV, and many other viruses?
I do agree that some so-called pests are usefull (damn mosquitoes that feed birdsand so on), but I definetely would not generalize too fast. And it would be interesting to measure if the by products of ascaris infestations gives a higher fitness to infested people.

Patrick
User avatar
canalon
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 3909
Joined: Thu Feb 03, 2005 2:46 pm
Location: Canada

Next

Return to Microbiology

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest