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Transpiration and wind speed.

Plants!

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Postby SU_reptile » Thu May 04, 2006 6:34 pm

This is quite interesting topic but I don't have any idea how to carry it out. Is this to be something like an experiment, so you have to get a set of groups as controll group etc. I mean, do you have any idea how to measure the rate of transpiration? I know it is easy to observe such changes in water plants as waterweed (Elodea canadensis), but it has nothing in common with wind, hasn't it.
The other thing is that xerophytes offen have trichomes which prevent water from escaping from the chamber (I don't know exactly how it is called in English) present below the leaf surface. Then the wind have minor impact on transpiration process, hasn't it.
The one thing I am sure is that the wind increases the rate of transpiration (and it is event logical why).
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Postby Squid » Thu May 04, 2006 7:12 pm

Use a xerophyte and a mesophyte
they are the best to compare
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Postby Lidlim » Sun May 07, 2006 11:45 am

I was thinking of using Marram Grass and Rhododendron Azalea do you think they would be ok?
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Postby orville » Sun May 07, 2006 9:55 pm

Hey!
Im using wild privet and cherry laurel. The cactus thing is a good idea only then you've got a new factor introduced- surface area. Makes things too complicated! At least with those two their surface area is relatively similar!
Hope this was of some use..? :wink:
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Postby SU_reptile » Mon May 08, 2006 6:43 pm

So do you know how to conduct the experiment. How do you intend to measure the rate of transpiration? I am very curious about the technique and results :D .
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Postby Katti » Wed May 10, 2006 2:29 pm

If it helps, privet is indeed a xerophyte, or so I believe...
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Postby funtime » Thu May 11, 2006 6:59 pm

hey there! i am doing the same for my practical exam, and we were told today that you don't actually need to name any plants at all - just describe (great quotes can be found on wikipedia, search xerophytes, in Biology1 textbook, or Advanced Biology, by Mary Jones and Geoff Jones). it kinda annoyed me as i'd spent half the lesson researching plants (am not a natural gardener!) if you can quote the typical adaptations of the xerophyte, and put how these prevent transpiration (scientifically) and compare it to the transpiration process in a 'normal' plant, that should be what you need! good luck for tuesday! 8)
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Postby orville » Thu May 11, 2006 8:29 pm

Hey! I'm using a potometer to measure WATER UPTAKE and not transpiration cos that is nearly impossible! water uptake has a very close relationship with it though so you can get in some pretty pie charts and stuff! just mention that 98% of water uptake is 'lost' via transpiration although the other 2% is used in photosynthesis and stuff!
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Postby SU_reptile » Sat May 13, 2006 9:13 pm

Uff. I was considering measuring the water uptake but I didn't know what device is used for that purpose.
In secondary school I was quite weak at planning experiments :oops: but I hope I will learn such things till third year :wink:
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