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Heart rate and temperature

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Heart rate and temperature

Postby bookworm29 » Sun Apr 16, 2006 8:48 pm

how does temperature effect heart rate. :D
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Postby mith » Mon Apr 17, 2006 1:46 am

if it's too hot you die and your heart stops....
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Postby kiekyon » Mon Apr 17, 2006 2:58 am

Temperature is always a controlling factor for chemical reactions. Having said that, it follows that the heart beat is a function of chemical processes. The heart beats in response to an electrical impulse in all the myocardial (heart muscle) fibers that initiates a chain reaction starting with calcium interacting with some complex protein molecules in each of the cells. This Ca— protein interaction brings about the contractile event and is a chemical reaction using ATP (adenosine triphosphate) as the energy source to drive each contraction.

A chemical reaction approximately doubles its rate every time you increase the temperature 10 degrees centigrade, and approximately halves its rate every time you decrease the temperature 10 degrees centigrade. Therefore, when you catch a cold and begin to run a fever (elevated temperature) all chemical processes in your body will speed up a little bit. This will happen without any increased physical activity. If you fall overboard in the winter into cold water, you depress your temperature and all the chemical process will slow down a little bit, unless you don’t get hauled out of the water quickly, in which case your chemical process would come to a complete halt. Not a happy thought but something one needs to consider when going out on the water when it is very cold.

So you see that an increase in temperature upward from 37 C (normal value) would definitely increase the heart rate in a direct correlative manner. This is due, at the most basic level, to the increase in atomic and molecular movement (Brownian motion) that occurs with heating any system including the body. Just like heating water makes the molecules move around faster and eventually boil off into the air if heated greatly, the molecules in our bodies bump each other much more frequently when the temperature goes up and this increases the chemical rates of reaction.
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Postby mith » Mon Apr 17, 2006 4:28 am

I think its more of how your heart rate would increase to increase skin cooling but that's just my 2 cents.
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Postby Poison » Mon Apr 17, 2006 6:58 pm

Increases until a point.
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Postby kiekyon » Tue Apr 18, 2006 12:53 pm

mithrilhack wrote:I think its more of how your heart rate would increase to increase skin cooling but that's just my 2 cents.


that's true..
however note that the question

bookworm wrote:how does temperature effect heart rate.




and not how heart rate affect temperature

this is an example of negative feedback mechanism

as i said earlier,
temperature increase --> heartbeat increase
and to a point as poison said,
heart beat increase --> body temperature decrease (cooling effect as mithril said)

:D
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Re:

Postby cluedo » Wed Nov 24, 2010 1:15 pm

kiekyon wrote:Temperature is always a controlling factor for chemical reactions. Having said that, it follows that the heart beat is a function of chemical processes. The heart beats in response to an electrical impulse in all the myocardial (heart muscle) fibers that initiates a chain reaction starting with calcium interacting with some complex protein molecules in each of the cells. This Ca— protein interaction brings about the contractile event and is a chemical reaction using ATP (adenosine triphosphate) as the energy source to drive each contraction.

A chemical reaction approximately doubles its rate every time you increase the temperature 10 degrees centigrade, and approximately halves its rate every time you decrease the temperature 10 degrees centigrade. Therefore, when you catch a cold and begin to run a fever (elevated temperature) all chemical processes in your body will speed up a little bit. This will happen without any increased physical activity. If you fall overboard in the winter into cold water, you depress your temperature and all the chemical process will slow down a little bit, unless you don’t get hauled out of the water quickly, in which case your chemical process would come to a complete halt. Not a happy thought but something one needs to consider when going out on the water when it is very cold.

So you see that an increase in temperature upward from 37 C (normal value) would definitely increase the heart rate in a direct correlative manner. This is due, at the most basic level, to the increase in atomic and molecular movement (Brownian motion) that occurs with heating any system including the body. Just like heating water makes the molecules move around faster and eventually boil off into the air if heated greatly, the molecules in our bodies bump each other much more frequently when the temperature goes up and this increases the chemical rates of reaction.


I was wondering where you got your information because I need it for an essay I'm in the process of writing.
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